CustomerJourneyMap-web CustomerJourneyMap-web

Customer Journey Map Template

Design the best experience from your customer’s point of view.

About the Customer Journey Map Template

A customer journey map (CJM) is a visual representation of how your customer experiences your product or service. Customers are the lifeblood of your business, so it’s crucial that you empathize with their pain points, wants, and needs so you can design a customer experience with them in mind.

Whether you’re in sales, marketing, product, or engineering, use a CJM to capture your customer’s experience for each persona, solve problems that arise in your products and services, and fill gaps.

Why use a Customer Journey Map template?

One of the major reasons that businesses use customer journey maps is to get a more incisive understanding of how the customer experiences their product. Mapping out customer journeys helps explain why customers make the choices they do and which aspect of your product is most valuable to them. 

Relatedly, customer journey mapping can help you figure out how and when to update your product or add new features. By helping you hone in on one of the steps and features that are most important to a customer, you can better understand which updates will benefit them the most. 

To drill down further, use a customer journey map template to get a better idea of how various personas interact with your product. Armed with this understanding, you can create different pathways for different personas and provide a more personalized experience. 

Finally, by helping you understand customer needs, a user journey map template will enable you to identify the points in the journey when your customers need the most help, and then target your customer support efforts towards those parts.

When to Use a Customer Journey Map

Mapping out a customer journey can be done anytime you want to understand the customer’s perspective, solve a particular problem, or improve cross-functional alignment.

Create your own Customer Journey Map using our template

1. Set objectives. Think about what you want to accomplish. That might be a problem you’re trying to solve, a product you’re trying to launch or update, or an experience you want to learn more about. Articulate the challenges you’re facing so you can better use your CJM. Then write down your objectives.

2. Create personas. Build a complete picture of the customer whose journey you will capture in your map. Use all the demographic and psychographic data available to you to create your personas.

3. List touchpoints. Touchpoints are all the places on your website or in your brand journey where customers might interact with the company, your products, goods, or services. List the ones your customers are already using. Next, list the ones you would like them to use in an ideal world.

4. Identify elements to show on the map. Customer journey maps can be as zoomed-in or zoomed-out as you need. Working with your team, decide whether you want to plan out an idealized version or the current state of the customer journey, a day in your customer’s life and how your brand might add value, or a service blueprint.

5. Map out the resources you have and need. Once you start mapping, you’ll start to see gaps in the customer journey. As you develop the map, use Miro’s online whiteboard to draw up a list of resources you will need to fill in those gaps. Flesh out the map by adding those resources and tools. That way, you can more accurately predict how adding or subtracting touchpoints might impact your business and drive revenue.

6. Test it out. Work through the CJM and see if you can answer the questions you posed at the beginning of the process. Then, you can better visualize how to meet your team’s objectives.

7. Iterate as necessary. Once you’ve test-driven the map, make any necessary changes. You may want to repeat the process over time as you add new features and updates.

FAQ about the Customer Journey Map template

How do I create a customer journey map from a template?

You can create your CJM with Miro’s Customer Journey map free template and customize it according to your brand or product needs. When creating your own CJM template, remember to define the scope and touchpoints you want to analyze and who inside your organization has ownership of which step.

Customer Journey Map Template

Get started with this template right now. It’s free

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