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User Story Map Framework Template

Define and arrange your user's journey in a simple and visual way.

About the User Story Map Template

First popularized by Jeff Patton in 2005, the user story mapping technique is an agile way to manage product backlogs. But what are user story maps and how can you create one with your Product Team? Keep reading to learn more.

What is a user story map?

Quite simply, user story mapping is a framework that product teams use for release planning. It helps them stay focused on the business value and release features that customers care about. The map consists of user stories written in the following way:

As a < type of user >, I want < some goal > so that < some outcome >

It is usually a card for team conversation where success is determined by the acceptance criteria. The framework helps to get a shared understanding for the cross-functional team of what needs to be done to satisfy customers' needs.

Benefits of user story mapping

User story mapping provides a visual guide for design and product development teams to use as their own roadmap in the formulation and iteration of a product. 

Identify each step in the customer journey

One of the major benefits of user story mapping is that it forces you to walk through each touchpoint the customer has with your product and take a holistic view of the customer experience. As a designer or product developer, it’s easy to get lost in the backend view, so getting a firsthand view of how the customer experiences the product is critical to shaping it properly. 

Visualize & manage product backlog

User story mapping also helps teams map out specific tasks that need to be completed in a dynamic and visual way. With a user story map you can identify large projects, break them down into constituent tasks, and delegate to specific team members, all with the overarching framework of the customer experience driving the process. 

Brainstorm & prioritize tasks

Plotting out the user journey through your product via a user story map also helps you identify gaps in the journey that need to be filled. Your team can see the map from end-to-end and brainstorm tasks and projects to fill in any gaps, and then prioritize these tasks collaboratively.

Common challenges of user story mapping

Here are some common problems that team encounter when user story mapping, and how to fix them. 

Lack of user personas

A clearly-defined user persona is the basis of a successful user story map (it’s the “user” part of “user story mapping!). Different personas may have a different journey through your product, so multiple personas may require multiple user story maps. But if you don’t have a clearly-defined user persona, you’ll struggle to understand what the goals of your users are with your product. 

Lack of clear objective

User story mapping should also have a clear objective. Whether you’re trying to solve a specific problem, or identify and fix gaps within the customer journey, or find ways to reduce churn, you need to start the process with a clearly-stated goal. 

Not enough stakeholders involved

A user story map should bring in various different parties at your company. Marketing and sales, UX & UI, product development, and customer service teams all have unique insights on the various touchpoints users have with your product, so all should be consulted for a holistic view.

When to use the User Story Map Template

Gone are the days when teams could easily congregate in a conference room and map user stories together on a whiteboard. They would use office supplies to tag and label their map, then take a picture to digitize it later. This User Story Map Template in Miro allows teams to save time by collaborating remotely, in real time on a digital, interactive whiteboard.

Product Managers and Scrum Masters will rejoice with this simple, easy to use tool that’ll allow their teams to map stories, automatically connect with Jira, and work side by side, even if they can’t be in the same place. 

How to create your user story map board in Miro

Miro’s user story mapping tool allows you to manage stories collaboratively online, no matter your location. Never run out of whiteboard space with the infinite canvas, and work in real-time with your team. Here’s how to create your own team canvas using the User Story Map Template:

1. Add the User Story Map Template to a Miro board

Get started by clicking “Use This Template”. Or, on a blank Miro board, install a framework from the Miro Marketplace and it’ll be added to your toolbar. The template starts with three blank cards where you can add user activities, tasks and stories. 

2. Identify your user persona, then describe step-by-step user tasks

Group user tasks by goals or activities for the user. Expand a card to write more text and quickly format it. Then, add valuable details by filling in due dates, assignees, tags and links.

3. Prioritize the stories for a sprint

To edit the structure of your map, drag and drop individual cards or groups of cards and the template will adjust automatically. Insert sections for upcoming releases and versions.

4. Get ready for a sprint

If you work with Jira, paste an issue URL or convert cards to Jira issues right from the board. If you work with Jira, paste an issue URL or convert cards to Jira issues right from the board.

5. Collaborate with your team

Invite teammates to contribute and work together in real-time. Refer to the user story map over time as you create new iterations of the product and add new functionality, and update it based on new data or findings as users try the product.

User Story Map Framework Template

Get started with this template right now. It’s free

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