Product RoadmapProduct Roadmap

Product Roadmap (Basic) Template

Track and align your team contributions from product launch to maturity

About the Product Roadmap template

What is a product roadmap? 

Product roadmaps help communicate the vision and progress of what’s coming next for your product. It’s an important asset for aligning teams and valuable stakeholders – including executives, engineering, marketing, customer success, and sales – around your strategy and priorities. Product roadmapping can inform future project management, describe new features and product goals, and spell out the lifecycle of a new product.

When creating a product roadmap, you should consider the long-term and short-term goals of your company, as well as the amount of available resources. Product managers are typically in charge of creating the product roadmap, prioritizing ideas gathered from across the organization, and getting buy-in from the various relevant stakeholders. 

3 elements of a product roadmap

There are a lot of different ways to create a product roadmap, and the structure you use depends on multiple factors, including whether you’re an Agile team or using a different model like Waterfall. Below, we outline a few elements that you can include if you’re building your product roadmap in Miro.  

1. Which products or features you’re building

There are always a bunch of options for the next product or feature to build. Your product roadmap should list the ones you’ve chosen to prioritize, which may be organized around strategic themes. 

2. When you’re building those products or features

Miro’s product roadmap template is organized around sprints. Based on the time estimates for how long it will take to complete different stages, add each feature to a sprint. 

3. Who is involved at each stage

You can add anyone who is part of the product development process, including designers, developers, product managers, marketers, and more. 

How to create a product roadmap in four steps

Product roadmaps can have a number of different audiences, from executives to external customers to internal development teams. Consider who the audience is for your product roadmap, so you know how to tailor it. 

Step 1: Define your strategy

Before jumping into adding features to your roadmap, take a step back to consider the “why.” A product strategy starts with your business goals. What are you trying to achieve? What pain points are you solving for users? How will you differentiate from other products on the market? 

Step 2: Gather requirements from cross-functional stakeholders

There are multiple teams across the organization that can help you understand what features to build next. For example, Customer Success and Sales teams spend most of their time talking directly with users – leverage their knowledge and feedback to create a list. 

It’s a good idea to also talk to other members of the Product team and Marketing team to incorporate their learnings and perspective.

Step 3: Prioritize requirements

Many product managers prioritize features by organizing them into themes. Themes will help you tie everything you add to your roadmap back to your overall product strategy, and to communicate why you’ve decided to build certain features (but not others) to stakeholders. 

Step 4: Create a timeline

To help set expectations, it’s important to provide some estimates in terms of when you’ll be working on different features. Miro’s product roadmap template is organized around sprints, so you can add items under the appropriate two-week period. 

Keep in mind that your roadmap will need to be flexible, because timelines will inevitably change. Staying agile is part of the process!

Product Roadmap (Basic) Template

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