Job MapJob Map

Job Map Template

Visualize step-by-step what your customer does to achieve their goals.

About the Job Map Template

Job mapping deconstructs the steps a customer takes to “hire” a product or service for a job they need to do. Your team’s user experience researchers or product managers can first use the Jobs to Be Done framework to understand why customers “hire” or “fire” your product or service. Job mapping is the next logical step to dig deeper into what customers are trying to do at every step of the process. 

The multi-step breakdown also helps teams visualize how customers measure success when they “hire” a product or service to get a job done. 

Keep reading to learn more about job mapping.

What is a Job Map

Job Mapping is a staged process that helps organizations better understand what their customers want to do. The mapping also highlights opportunities to offer something new or different from their competitors. 

UX researchers and product managers should remind their teams:

  • Every job is a process, from start to finish, viewed from the customer’s perspective. 

  • The value of mapping out the steps is to critically examine, and improve, each step. Steps may need to be removed, introduced, reshuffled, enabled, or responsibility transferred from customer to organization. Job mapping helps teams articulate the what, why, and how of these changes. 

  • Job types can change, but what needs to happen from start to finish stays the same. 

  • Every customer is different, but jobs are structured similarly. Customers must figure out what they need to do the job. First, they'll find any necessary inputs, then prepare each part of the job and where it will happen, follow through on tasks, make changes as needed, then finish the job.

  • Jobs are different from solutions. 

  • Customers can hire both you and your competitor for different steps in the “jobs to be done” process. Less about solving a problem, jobs are more about improving a product or service offering to pursue new market opportunities. 

When to use a job map

A job map can be used whenever the core functional job customers are trying to do must be defined step-by-step. This can help UX researchers determine the ideal outcome and locate challenges or obstacles to making it happen.

The job map role is to help teams take the customer’s perspective (rather than focus on solutions a company offers) and create a simple job statement. A job map is also useful as a stable framework that allows you to find groups of people your product or service should target. For example, regardless of the solution (the how), there will always be people who want to cook lasagna. 

Create your own Job Map

Making your own Job Maps is easy. Miro’s whiteboard tool is the perfect canvas to create and share them. Get started by selecting the Job Map Template, then take the following steps to make one of your own.

  1. Invite your customer to define the characteristics of the job to be done.

  2. Ideally, your customer will name the job to be done before you meet one-on-one. Remind them that it doesn’t have to be emotionally or socially expressed. If they’ve done this by default, that’s okay. Work with them to define the job, not the situation, for instance, “stay updated on world news,” not “wait in line at grocery store.” 

  3. Have the customer name inputs and materials needed to get the job done.

  4. Encourage them to draft sticky notes for the steps taken to perform a job. For example, if they’re in planning mode, what do they do? If they need more sticky notes, they can duplicate and edit them. 

  5. Help the customer focus on just one part of the job. 

  6. Let the customer know that even if they mapped out multiple steps, you need only focus on one. Dig into the desired outcomes and challenges faced for more insight into what impacts the job to be done. There are no wrong answers, so customers shouldn’t spend more than one hour on the exercise. 

  7. Brainstorm what you can do to make the process easier.

  8. As a team, review the data the customer has offered across all stages. Confirm what they prioritize, and how they address risks to their time, money, and safety. 

  9. Help customers access information to decide if they’re ready to do a job, and offer alternatives to get the job done.

  10. How can the step-by-step job be faster and easier for the customer? Consider changes for better timing, ways to meet demands, and shifting responsibility from customer to organization to lead to a higher financial return on investment.

Job Map Template

Get started with this template right now. It’s free

Related Templates
Eisenhower Matrix ThumbnailEisenhower Matrix Thumbnail
Preview

Eisenhower Matrix

Have an overwhelming list of to-dos? Prioritize them based on two key factors: urgency and importance. It worked for American president Dwight D. Eisenhower, and it can work for you—this decision-making framework will help you know where to start and how to plan your day. With our template, you can easily build an Eisenhower Matrix with a quadrant of key areas (Do, Schedule, Delegate, and Don’t Do) and revisit it throughout the day as your priorities change.

Eisenhower Matrix
Fibonacci Scale ThumbnailFibonacci Scale Thumbnail
Preview

Fibonacci Scale

When you manage a team, you often have to estimate how much time and effort tasks will take to complete. Try what often works for Agile teams all over the world: Turn to the Fibonacci Scale for guidance. Based on the Fibonacci sequence, where each number is the summation of the two previous numbers (0, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, etc.), this template can help you build timelines like a champ—by helping make sure that work is distributed evenly and that everyone is accurate when estimating the work and time involved in a project.

Fibonacci Scale
Burndown Chart ThumbnailBurndown Chart Thumbnail
Preview

Burndown Chart

Whoa whoa whoa, pace yourself! That means knowing how much work is left—and, based on the delivery date, how much time you’ll have for each task. Perfect for project managers, Burndown Charts create a clear visualization of a team’s remaining work to help get it done on time and on budget. These charts have other big benefits, too. They encourage transparency and help individual team members be aware of their work pace so they can adjust or maintain it.

Burndown Chart
RACI Matrix ThumbnailRACI Matrix Thumbnail
Preview

RACI Matrix

The RACI Matrix is an essential management tool that helps teams keep track of roles and responsibilities and can avoid confusion during projects. The acronym RACI stands for Responsible (the person who does the work to achieve the task and is responsible for getting the work done or decision made); Accountable (the person who is accountable for the correct and thorough completion of the task); Consulted (the people who provide information for the project and with whom there is two-way communication); Informed (the people who are kept informed of progress and with whom there is one-way communication).

RACI Matrix
Competitive Analysis ThumbnailCompetitive Analysis Thumbnail
Preview

Competitive Analysis

Developing a great product starts with knowing the lay of the land (meaning who you’re up against) and answering a few questions: Who are your competitors? How does your product or service compare? What makes you stand out? A competitive analysis will help find the answers, which can ultimately shape your product, value prop, marketing, and sales strategies. It’s a great exercise when a big business event is about to occur — like a new product release or strategic planning session.

Competitive Analysis
3 Horizons of Growth Thumbnail3 Horizons of Growth Thumbnail
Preview

3 Horizons of Growth

Featured in The Alchemy of Growth, this model gives ambitious companies a way to balance the present and the future—in other words, what’s working in the existing business and what emerging, possibly-profitable growth opportunities lie ahead. Then teams across the organization can make sure that their projects map to and support the organization’s goals. The 3 Horizons of Growth model is also a powerful way to foster a culture of innovation—one that values and depends on experimentation and iteration—and to identify opportunities for new business.

3 Horizons of Growth