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Likert Scale Template

Use our 5 (or 7) Point Likert Scale to measure attitudes, knowledge, values and opinions with a greater degree of nuance.

About the Likert Scale Template

The Likert scale is a rating system you can use to measure complex, subjective data such as how people feel about your product, service, or experience. 

Your customers (or potential customers, engaged as interview subjects) can pick out a possible response to a statement or question that’s either expressed in words or numbers. 

Examples of responses include a range such as “strongly agree,” “neutral,” “agree,” “disagree” or “strongly disagree,” or “strongly satisfied” to “strongly dissatisfied.” You can also use numbers, such as 1 = “strongly agree,” 2 = “agree,” and so on. 

The goal is to ask your customer some specific questions to turn into easy-to-interpret actionable user insights. 

What is a Likert Scale?

The Likert scale is either a five (or seven) point scale of response options that asks your customer or interview subject to agree or disagree with a statement. 

The scale assumes that the intensity of someone’s attitude or opinion is linear, ranging from strongly agree to strongly disagree, and assumes that attitudes can be measured.

For example, each of the five (or seven) responses would either be counted in terms of how often a sentiment was expressed or have a numerical value that would be used to measure the attitude being explored. 

Likert data can be a reliable source to point to how people think and feel, as long as you’re aware of the when-in-doubt-just-agree tendency. 

To reduce the impact of this bias, researchers can...

  • Phrase questions as statements: presenting facts for customers to align with (or reject) can offer insight into different pieces of your business. Accordingly, the score averages give you a general measure of satisfaction that you can track over time and try to improve.

  • Include and evaluate both positive and negative statements, in pairs, for consistency: instead of measuring one-off sentiments, see if your customers are reliably in agreement, disagreement, or neutral in more than one instance. 

When to use the Likert scale tempate

Researchers across disciplines (from UX to marketing to customer experience, for example) can use a Likert scale to measure statements of agreement. 

Depending on your product, service, or experience, the scale can also be used to measure:

  • Agreement: Strongly agree → strongly disagree

  • Frequency: Often → never

  • Quality: Very good → very bad

  • Likelihood: Definitely → never

  • Importance: Very important → unimportant

To get a more accurate measurement of everyone’s responses, it’s worth asking people to agree or disagree with multiple statements. You can then combine or average a person’s responses. 

Create your own Likert Scale

Making your own Likert scale is easy. Miro’s whiteboard tool is the perfect canvas to create and share them. Get started by selecting the Likert Scale Template, then take the following steps to make one of your own:

  1. Decide what you’d like to measure. This is the foundation for your Miro Board. Ensure that what you’re measuring can be scaled on the strength of opinions, attitudes, feelings, or experiences. Customers should see two clear extremes (positive and negative) and a neutral midpoint.

  2. Create or edit your Likert scale indicator statements or questions. The scale works best when you’re trying to find customer insights that can’t be understood with just one answer. An example statement could be, “The number of items on the takeaway menu overwhelms me.” Every statement (or each question) is trying to dig into what your customer actually feels. 

  3. Decide on Likert response scales. At a minimum, you can aim for a 5-point scale. At maximum, a 7-point scale. Any less or any more can compromise readability. Choose simple, clear language with different categories, such as “Agree - Disagree,” “Helpful - Not Helpful,” “Always - Never.” You can add or delete sticky notes (which can act as points and categories) accordingly. 

  4. Pre-test with your team. Share the Miro Board with your team to test any unclear questions, awkwardly worded statements, or duplicate categories. Ask your team if every element on the scale can help you gather actionable feedback. If not, revise or delete that element. 

  5. Test (and re-test) as needed. Invite participants onto your Miro Board and ask them to respond to each statement or question. Try dot voting. Data collection should be a process that you keep fine-tuning over time. Start with a small sample group of participants representing a larger group you’re trying to learn about. Refine – or expand – your point scale and category language as you get user feedback and calculate results. 

  6. Organize and import Likert Scale survey results visually from other sources. Import survey results as needed on your Miro Board, to share and review with your team.

FAQs on the Likert Scale Template
Likert Scale Template

Get started with this template right now.

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