STARSTAR

STAR Template

Practice job interview questions by creating structured, concise answers.

About the STAR Template

STAR is a framework that stands for Situation, Task, Action, Result. Use this strategy to answer interview questions with concrete examples to show that you have the skills and experience you need. Many hiring managers or interviewer panels will ask prospective employees competency-based questions such as, “Tell me about a time when you …” or “Share an example of a situation where. …” 

Not every interview response calls for a STAR framework. Some responses may be a better fit for the CARL (Challenge, Action, Result, Learning) or PAR (Problem, Action, Result) frameworks. You can adapt and edit this template as needed.

If you’re an employer, you can use STAR to clarify with your team what skills and personality traits make someone a successful, high-level performer.

Keep reading to learn more about the STAR Template.

What is the STAR framework

The STAR framework helps you give concise and relevant answers to a range of job interview questions. Each framework element connects with the others to help you tell a compelling story. This STAR approach can demonstrate how past behavior has developed your learning and professional experience. With practice and preparation, you can determine how much information to share about your accomplishments.

Here’s what each element means:

  • Situation: A specific event or situation when you needed to accomplish something. 

  • Task: The goal you (or your team) were working toward.

  • Action: The actions you took to solve a problem or contribute to achieving a goal. 

  • Result: The outcome of your actions and positive results you can take credit for. 

When to use the STAR Template

Job candidates can use the STAR Template to develop contextual answers that positively demonstrate their skills and expertise. For examples revealing a negative outcome, you can instead apply a CARL framework (Challenge, Action, Result, Learning). For situations that didn’t turn out as planned, make sure you focus on learning and self-development in tough situations. 

Employers or internal teams can collaborate on the STAR Template to identify non-negotiable and “nice to have” behavioral aspects of critical competencies of successful additions to the team. Every applicant brings unique strengths, perspective, and personality to a new role. 

Create your own STAR framework

Familiarizing yourself with the STAR framework will help you build confidence as you prepare for job interviews. In addition, following it will help you tell the story of why you’re not only the ideal person for the job but the missing link in the team. 

Get started by selecting the STAR Template, and customize the default framework as needed. If STAR isn’t your preferred framework, you can instead adapt the headings to “CARL” (Challenge, Action, Result, Learning) or “PAR” (Problem, Action, or Result).

  1. Think of recent professional situations that can make the case for you as an optimal candidate. These can broadly fall under demonstrating behaviors in leadership, teamwork, initiative, planning, and customer service.

  2. Draft up short descriptions of each situation so you can recall them easily. Add some details with Miro’s sticky notes feature if you need more in-depth answers.

  3. Check that each example follows a storytelling structure. Remember, you need a beginning, middle, and end. How did the situation and task lead to action and results?

  4. Do a positivity check. Maybe the results didn’t turn out as planned. That’s okay – what did you do that still reflected positively on yourself as an individual and team player?

  5. Keep it honest. If asked about a situation you’ve never been in before, map out on the Situation, Task, and Action sections with how you plan to handle the challenge. You can also discuss metrics you’d use to measure success.

  6. Include details. Give a detailed account of a specific situation – this will build a stronger case for you than broad generalizations. You can use comments on top of text boxes or sticky notes to add more information. 

  7. Demonstrate experience from different roles and times in your career. Try to point to experience in other industries, leading by example, working on tools, or contributing to team culture. These can be color-coded with sticky notes to coordinate details when you need to recall them in the moment. 

  8. Practice your responses verbally without relying on your notes. Need feedback or extra motivation? Ask a colleague or mentor to hop on a video call with you. To start a video chat without leaving your Miro Board, find the Video Chat icon in the bottom toolbar, and click “Start.”

STAR Template

Get started with this template right now. It’s free

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