SMART GoalsSMART Goals

SMART Goals Template

Stay focused and align your team according to the SMART method.

About the SMART Goals template

What are SMART goals?

SMART is a framework that stands for: Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Relevant, and Timely. Keep each of these parameters in mind anytime you’re setting a goal to adhere to the SMART framework. SMART goals ensure that your objectives are clear to all team members, and that they are reachable.

Your team can use the SMART model anytime you want to set goals. You can also use SMART whenever you want to reevaluate and refine those goals.

Benefits of setting SMART goals 

Setting goals can be encouraging, but can also be overwhelming. It can be hard to conceptualize every step you need to take to achieve a goal, which makes it easy to set goals that are too broad or too much of a stretch.

SMART goals, by contrast, allow you to set goals that are clear, actionable, and effective. When you’re working with a team, SMART goals help you align, encourage you to define your objectives, and empower you to set deadlines. You can loop in new employees without having to conduct extensive, time-consuming training.

Create your own SMART goals 

Miro’s whiteboard tool is the perfect canvas to create and share your team’s SMART goals. Get started by selecting this SMART Goals template. Then, follow these steps:

Step 1: To be specific, add as many ideas as you can to identify patterns and determine the particular goal you want to pursue. Add sticky notes, move them around the board, and cluster ideas with shapes and frames to stay organized. 

Step 2: Make sure your goals are measurable by adding details and metrics and making note of anything you want to track. You can also add more templates to your board like Gantt charts, milestone charts, or action plans. 

Step 3: To make your goals attainable, consider splitting them into smaller steps that you prioritize so you can achieve results quickly. And, think about whether the goals are realistic, given constraints like financing.

Step 4: To ensure your goals are relevant, be sure to align them with your company’s goals, mission, and vision. You can easily share your goals with leaders to get their input. 

Step 5: To create timely goals, make sure each one gets assigned a deadline, whether short-term (“what can I do today?”) or long-term (“what can I do in six months?”). 

Example of an effective SMART goal

Our marketing team will increase brand awareness by 5% this quarter by revamping our content strategy over the next month and creating new content that improves our lagging brand awareness by the end of the quarter.

  • Specific: The team has set a clear goal: to increase brand awareness by 5%.

  • Measurable: The team has made it easy to measure success. If they achieve less than 5%, fail to revamp content strategy, or do not create new content, then they have not achieved their goal.

  • Attainable: The team has outlined the necessary steps for achieving this goal.

  • Relevant: The team acknowledges that their current brand awareness is lagging.

  • Time-based: The team has determined that they will achieve their goal by the end of the quarter.

SMART Goals Template

Get started with this template right now. It’s free

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