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Stickies Packs Template

Get team members moving, sharing, and generating ideas quickly.

About the Stickies Pack

Sticky notes can help your team gather data and insights during brainstorming, workshop, or retrospective sessions. Sticky note packs also form the basis of many UX group processes, such as ideation, affinity diagramming, and design thinking. 

Keep reading to learn more about stickies packs.

What are stickies packs

Pre-labeled sticky packs enable you to keep track of research, identify knowledge gaps and growth areas, and keep ideas concise.

Sticky note packs are useful for keeping meetings and workshops on task because they drive action (recording thoughts) rather than relying on talk alone as a way to share ideas. By adding participant names to sticky notes, team members are encouraged to contribute to group activity, and stay present and accountable by taking ownership of their ideas. 

When to use stickies packs

There are no set rules (or right way”) for using sticky notes – use them according to your team dynamics and your project's context. 

Copy over Miro’s pre-labeled sticky packs into any template from the template library

These sticky notes can help cross-functional teams (not just designers!):

  • Quickly collect different ideas and group together similar ideas

  • Make sense of a complex system using lo-fi methods

  • Get colleagues, clients, or stakeholders thinking, sharing, and generating ideas at speed

  • Encourage everyone to try new and different methods or tools 

  • Combine your team’s collective intelligence into a single common visual space

  • Prioritize ideas and convert them into action items

  • Turn handwritten notes into digital stickies

Sticky notes can’t replace process, strategy, or high-fidelity methods – instead, they help you start scrappy and make sure everyone on your team (regardless of personality type or place in an organizational chart) has a voice and perspective to share. 

Apply your stickies packs to other Miro templates

Using your own stickies packs is easy. Miro’s whiteboard tool is the perfect canvas to create and share them. Get started by selecting the Stickies Packs Template, then take the following steps to use them on other templates as needed.

  1. Decide what type of activity would benefit your team. You can choose a premade template for any team activity or group session from.

  2. Copy over the sticky pack to your preferred Miro template. Select all elements on the board using the Ctrl+A/Cmd+A shortcut. Navigate to the Miro Board that you’ve set up for a group session, and use Ctrl+V/Cmd+V to paste the stickies pack. Duplicate the stickies pack as needed by using Ctrl+D/Cmd+D as needed to accommodate new participants joining your session.

  3. Ask your colleagues to label their sticky packs with their names. Each sticky note in a pack comes labeled with a “participant” text box. You can edit this box to include your name to keep everyone's ideas or contributions attributed.

  4. Start your group session. You’re all set to get started! If this is a timeboxed group session, you may benefit from using a to keep your ideation or brainstorming on track. 

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