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Low-fidelity Wireframes Template

Sketch ideas quickly and share a “big picture” vision for your product.

About the Low Fidelity Wireframe Template

Low fidelity wireframes are blueprints for web pages or app screens. Looking for an interactive wireframe template that still serves as a practical, early vision of your product? That sounds like a low fidelity prototype. Miro also has a separate Wireframe Template.

Typically, low fidelity wireframes are grayscale. Each frame also relies on basic shapes, image placeholders, and generic text to map layout for future designs. 

Product and UX teams can also use low fidelity wireframes to empower non-designers to help shape a product or service in early development stages. 

Keep reading to learn more about low fidelity wireframes.

What is a low fidelity wireframe

A low fidelity wireframe helps you communicate your product’s “big idea,” rather than specific details. Think of it as a rough layout: the digital equivalent of sketching a concept on the back of a napkin. 

The simple preliminary design enables teams and project stakeholders to quickly determine the best solutions for users. 

You can divide your screen into a series of labeled “zones” or “blocks” and indicate where elements like buttons, menus, images, text, and headings should sit on the screen. One screen will typically take a few minutes to sketch out. These can be linked together as a “wireflow” to show each screen's relationship or navigational order. Whether designer or non-designer, you shouldn’t worry at the low-fidelity stage about scale, fitting into a grid system, or being pixel-perfect in execution. 

When to use a low fidelity wireframe

Sequential low-fidelity wireframes are quick, easy representations, and a great way to explain an initial idea to your team, clients, or stakeholders. 

You can use low fidelity wireframes in:

  • Meetings or workshops, to turn your team’s ideas into visual sketches

  • Presentations, to quickly share several product ideas in development

  • Information architecture phases of product development, to focus on user flows

  • Critique sessions, for honest, actionable feedback or direction on rough work

Exploring concepts as early as possible in the development phase not only helps safeguard your team against last-minute changes or expensive setbacks, but also enables you to improve and refine your product. Your team can also consider different ways of approaching a problem – and encourage everyone’s voice to be heard. 

Create your own low fidelity wireframe

Making your own low fidelity wireframes is easy. Miro’s whiteboard tool is the perfect canvas to create and share them. Get started by selecting the Low Fidelity Wireframe Template, then take the following steps to make one of your own.

  1. Ask your team to take research notes or record ideas. Have your team write down some quick thoughts on sticky notes. Let everyone get comfortable with the board's default state, think about new potential solutions, and ask any questions. Everyone on your team can then review and reflect on the problem that needs solving, before you dive into sketches. 

  2. Sketch some initial rough ideas using the “Crazy Eights” method. Crazy Eights asks everyone to rapidly sketch 8 different screens or interactions in 8 minutes, equivalent to one wireframe per minute. The aim is to let go of perfection and instead get your ideas onto the screen as quickly as possible. Miro’s Wireframe Library allows you to create lo-fi solutions with over 15 UI components. 

  3. Create solution sketches or “wireflows” based on your best ideas. Now that you have a few individual sketches to work with, try adding some extra context (without getting caught up in the details). Stay focused on the information architecture (foundational structure) of each page or screen rather than the visual design. Use text boxes or sticky notes to label each screen and map out a narrative, e.g. “Landing Page” → “Our Product” → “Shopping Cart Checkout.” 

  4. Critique your solutions as a team. Spend ten minutes reviewing all the solutions and vote for the sketches you like best using Miro’s Voting Plugin. This helps you figure out together which ideas stand out. As a team, you can also discuss the wireflows to gain clarity, ask questions, and find patterns or common ideas from different sketches. 

Low-fidelity Wireframes Template

Get started with this template right now. It’s free

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