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Crazy Eights Template

Run wild with this sketch brainstorming method perfect for generating tons of ideas—fast!

About the Crazy Eights Template

What is Crazy Eights?

Crazy Eights is a quick and dirty sketch brainstorming exercise that challenges team members to sketch 8 ideas in 8 minutes. It keeps participants on their toes, forces quick thinking, and doesn’t allow time to weed out “bad ideas.” This is about quantity over quality and is a great way for your team to let loose and really push the boundaries of what’s possible.

Benefits of using this method

Crazy Eights is perfect for getting your own creative juices flowing during a brainstorm and drawing out ideas from colleagues. It’s short and fun—and most important, helps generate ideas. Not all of them will be great, but you can iterate, revise, and shape—as you and your teammates inspire each other.

When to use it

Crazy Eights is best used at the beginning stages of ideation. Keep the sessions small, just six to eight people. Whether you’re looking to redesign a website, the UX on a page, or even rebrand your company logo, it’s an effective way to kick-start the process.

How to use the Crazy Eights Template

Flexing your creative muscles has never been easier with Crazy Eights. Perfect for early stages of development, this ideation technique is a favorite for its fast-paced, time-boxed energy.

Step 1: Head to your Crazy Eights Template—since you’re working with distributed teams, we’ve generated a digital space with 8 clean boxes to make it simple.

Step 2: Use the Miro template. Using the 8 boxes in the Miro template, tell your team they have 8 minutes to sketch, draw, and ideate using the pen tool (or any other tool!) provided by Miro. This is not about perfection, but about output. Sketches can be as rough as you need!

Step 3: Make sure someone is keeping time. The timekeeper should update the team often so they can keep track and avoid wasting too much time on a single sketch.

Step 4: Repeat as many times as you want.

Step 5: Ask team members to present their top 3 ideas to the group. They should choose their 3 favorite ideas. Give them 6 more minutes to sketch out these ideas further. Then they can present them to the group.

Step 6: Vote! Using the voting tool provided by Miro, create a border around each board and dot vote.

Crazy Eights Template

Get started with this template right now. It’s free

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