Website Wireframing

Website Wireframing Template

Create a better user experience and reach your goals with our Website Wireframing Template. Map out your website elements and bring your vision to life all in one place.

About the Website Wireframe Template

A website wireframe template is a simple, effective tool that helps you arrange the visual elements and framework for each website page, allowing you to create the best version of your prototype. Many UX and product teams use website wireframes to align on the visual design, user flow, and website information architecture.

What is a website wireframe?

Website Wireframing is a method for designing a website at the structural level. It allows users to map out the main features and design. Simply put, a website wireframe is a stylized layout of a web page showcasing the interface elements on each page. Such as design elements, color schemes, and content.

Wireframing is a quick, cheap, and simple way to iterate on web pages, making it easy to share the website wireframe with clients or teammates and collaborate effectively with stakeholders. You can use various website wireframes examples to present to your clients or stakeholders to get buy-in without spending too much time or resources. They help ensure that your website’s structure and flow meet user needs and expectations.

Pro Tip: It is best to create a wireframe at the beginning stages of your development as it will give you clarity on any obstacles you may face and give you time to solve them.

When to use a website wireframe

Teams use wireframing to lay out content and functionality on a page mock-up. They can then map out user needs, journeys, and navigation on the page itself.

Many UX and product teams use website wireframe templates at an early stage of the development process to make sure the main page structure is sound before designing or adding content. The goal is to reach a common understanding of what a page will look like, so it’s possible that in this process, many website wireframes are created and quickly iterated until you reach the final version.

Create your website wireframe

Making your own website wireframe is easy. Miro’s whiteboard tool is the perfect canvas to create and share them. Get started by selecting the Website Wireframe Template, then take the following steps to make one of your own.

1. Be clear about your goals

At the beginning of this process, it is vital to define and understand the goals of your website.

Before you start wireframing, ask your team these questions: What do we hope to accomplish by creating this web page? What do we want to get out of this wireframing session? Do we want more traffic? Should they purchase something from our website? Download an app?

Whatever your goals are, ensure that your entire team is aligned so the process will be able to run more smoothly. Write answers down on sticky notes on your website wireframe template to keep them top of mind.

2. Think about the user experience

When your user interacts with your product, they’re taking a journey from one part of the website to the next. This enables everyone on your team to understand how the website visitor will interact with every page on your site. As a UX designer, your goal is to make that journey as effortless and enjoyable as possible. Think about user interactions, not individual screens. Design for flow. Outline every entry point a user may have, and from there, begin your journey flow.

Ask yourself these questions: What is important on this screen? How should the user interact with it?

3. Try to include content early in the process

Using actual content makes it easier to decide whether the intended copy will fit the design. In general, actual content generates better feedback, meaning your design will need fewer iterations later in the process. Here you can also determine which hyperlinks, images or other website elements you would like to add onto the page.

Be aware that wireframing is a very iterative process. It is normal to go back and forth and make lots of changes throughout the process. Don’t be discouraged by this. Wherever you can, try to simplify your wireframe and allow space to have fewer clicks for your user.

4. Annotate

Communication is key to getting people to understand your thought process. Don’t assume that your website wireframes speak for themselves — annotate as you wireframe to make it easier to receive feedback. Receiving feedback prevents getting lost in any miscommunications and will enhance collaboration within your development, design and internal teams as well as customers.

FAQ about website wireframes

How do you create a website wireframe?

You can create a website wireframe with our ready-made template and customize it to your needs. When creating a website wireframe, there are four essential steps: set your website wireframe goals, design user flow, iterate and prototype, and test. Set your goals based on your UX and UI research, then design your user flow and add content early on, if possible. Afterward, annotate on your website wireframe to explain your template to your teammates or stakeholders, then prototype, test, and iterate.

What does a wireframe look like?

The website wireframe often contains some design elements as placeholders, so designers at this stage can focus on the layout and page structure rather than the visual aspect of design. Most website wireframes also include a color palette.

When should you make a website wireframe?

It would be best to make the website wireframe early in the design process since it's a cheap and straightforward way to start working on visuals and is easily changeable. The initial website wireframe template is more about the layout itself; designs and content come later in the wireframing process.

Website Wireframing Template

Get started with this template right now.

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