Website WireframingWebsite Wireframing

Website Wireframing Template

Demonstrate what interface elements will exist on your visual design

About the Wireframe Template

A wireframe is a simple, effective visual tool that helps you arrange user interface elements on each page of your website, to create the best version of your prototype. Keep reading to learn more about wireframing.

What is a wireframe?

Wireframing is a method for designing a website at the structural level. A wireframe is a stylized layout of a web page showcasing the interface elements on each page. 

Wireframing is a quick, cheap, and simple way to iterate on web pages. You can share the wireframe with clients or teammates and collaborate with stakeholders. Wireframes allow teams to get stakeholder buy-in without investing too much time or resources. They help ensure that your website’s structure and flow will meet user needs and expectations.

When to use wireframing

Teams use wireframing to lay out content and functionality on a mock-up of a page. They can then map out user needs, journeys, and navigation on the page itself. Many teams use wireframes early in the development process to confirm the fundamental structure of a page is sound before they begin designing or adding content. The goal of wireframing is to convey a general understanding of what a page will look like. 

Create your own wireframe

Making your own wireframe is easy. Miro’s whiteboard tool is the perfect canvas to create and share them. Get started by selecting the Wireframe template, then take the following steps to make a one of your own.

  1. Be clear about your goals. Before you start wireframing, ask your team questions like, “What do we hope to accomplish by creating this web page? What do we want to get out of this wireframing session?” Write answers down on sticky notes in your wireframe board.

  2. Think about the user experience. When your user interacts with your product, they’re taking a journey from one part of the site to the next. As a UX designer, your goal is to make that journey as effortless and enjoyable as possible. Think about user interactions, not individual screens. Design for flow. Ask yourself questions like, “What is important on this screen? How should the user interact with it?”

  3. Try to include content early in the process. Using real content makes it easier to decide whether the intended copy will fit the design. In general, real content generates better feedback.

  4. Annotate. Don’t assume that your wireframes speak for themselves. Annotate as you wireframe to make it easier to receive feedback.

Website Wireframing Template

Get started with this template right now. It’s free

Related Templates
Design Brief ThumbnailDesign Brief Thumbnail
PreviewMore info

Design Brief

For a design to be successful, let alone to be great, design agencies and teams have to know the project’s goals, timelines, budget, and scope. In other words, design takes a strategic process—and that starts with a design brief. This helpful template will empower you to create a brief that builds alignment and clear communication between your business and your design agency. It’s the foundation of any creative project, and a single source of truth that teams can refer to all along the way.

Design Brief
Quick Retrospective ThumbnailQuick Retrospective Thumbnail
PreviewMore info

Quick Retrospective

A retrospective template empowers you to run insightful meetings, take stock of your work, and iterate effectively. The term “retrospective” has gained popularity over the more common “debriefing” and “post-mortem,” since it’s more value-neutral than the other terms. Some teams refer to these meetings as “sprint retrospectives” or “iteration retrospectives,” “agile retrospectives” or “iteration retrospectives.” Whether you are a scrum team, using the agile methodology, or doing a specific type of retrospective (e.g. a mad, sad, glad retrospective), the goals are generally the same: discovering what went well, identifying the root cause of problems you had, and finding ways to do better in the next iteration.

Quick Retrospective
Annual Calendar ThumbnailAnnual Calendar Thumbnail
PreviewMore info

Annual Calendar

Plenty of calendars help you focus on the day-to-day deadlines. With this one, it’s all about the big picture. Borrowing from the grid structure of 12-month wall calendars, this template shows you your projects, commitments, and goals one full year at a time. So you and your team can prepare to hunker down during busy periods, move things around as needed, and celebrate your progress. And getting started is so easy—just name your calendar’s color-coded streams and drag stickies onto the start date.

Annual Calendar
user-flow-thumb-webuser-flow-thumb-web
PreviewMore info

User Flow

User flows are diagrams that help UX and product teams map out the logical path a user should take when interacting with a system. As a visual tool, the user flow shows the relationship between a website or app’s functionality, potential actions a user could take, and the outcome of what the user decides to do. User flows help you understand what a user does to finish a task or complete a goal through your product or experience.

User Flow
newsletter-thumb-webnewsletter-thumb-web
PreviewMore info

Newsletter

Whatever kind of business you are or product you create, it’s a smart idea to keep in touch with your current and potential customers and keep them up to speed — by spreading news, promoting events, and sharing custom content. Newsletters give you an effective way to do it. And this template is a fast, easy way to get started. Just choose the content you want to highlight, write the copy, and add any pictures or images you want to include. Then write your subject line and click send.

Newsletter
Start Stop Continue Retrospective ThumbnailStart Stop Continue Retrospective Thumbnail
PreviewMore info

Start/ Stop/ Continue Retrospective

Giving and receiving feedback can be challenging and intimidating. It’s hard to look back over a quarter or even a week and parse a set of decisions into “positive” and “negative.” The Start Stop Continue framework was created to make it easier to reflect on your team’s recent experiences. The Start Stop Continue template encourages teams to look at specific actions they should start doing, stop doing, and continue doing. Together, collaborators agree on the most important steps to be more productive and successful.

Start/ Stop/ Continue Retrospective