Website WireframingWebsite Wireframing

Website Wireframing Template

Demonstrate what interface elements will exist on your visual design

About the Website Wireframe Template

A website wireframe template is a simple, effective tool that helps you arrange the visual elements and framework for each page of your website, allowing you to create the best version of your prototype.   

Keep reading to learn more about Website Wireframes.

What is a website wireframe? 

Website Wireframing is a method for designing a website at the structural level. A website wireframe is a stylized layout of a website showcasing the interface elements on each page. 

Wireframing is a quick, cheap, and simple way to iterate on web pages. You can share the website wireframe with clients or teammates and collaborate with stakeholders. You can use various website wireframe examples to present to your clients or stakeholders to get buy-in without much time or resources. They help ensure that your website’s structure and flow will meet user needs and expectations.

When to use a website wireframe

Teams use wireframing to lay out content and functionality on a mock-up of a page. They can then map out user needs, journeys, and navigation on the page itself. Many teams use website wireframes early in the development process to confirm the fundamental structure of a page is sound before they begin designing or adding content. The goal of using website wireframes is to convey a general understanding of what a page will look like. 

Create your own website wireframe

Making your own website wireframe is easy. Miro’s whiteboard tool is the perfect canvas to create and share them. Get started by selecting the Website Wireframe template, then take the following steps to make one of your own.

  1. Be clear about your goals. Before you start wireframing, ask your team questions like: “What do we hope to accomplish by creating this web page? What do we want to get out of this wireframing session?” Jot answers down on sticky notes on your website wireframe template to keep these goals in mind.

  2. Think about the user experience. When your user interacts with your product, they’re taking a journey from one part of the site to the next. As a UX designer, your goal is to make that journey as effortless and enjoyable as possible. Think about user interactions, not individual screens. Design for flow. Ask yourself questions like, “What is important on this screen? How should the user interact with it?”

  3. Try to include content early in the process. Using real content makes it easier to decide whether the intended copy will fit the design. In general, real content generates better feedback.

  4. Annotate. Don’t assume that your website wireframes speak for themselves. Annotate as you wireframe to make it easier to receive feedback and iterate faster.

FAQ about website wireframes

How do you create a website wireframe?

You can create a website wireframe with our template and customize it to your needs. As mentioned previously, there are four essential steps when creating a website wireframe: - Set your goals based on your UX and UI research - Design your user flow and add content early on, if possible - Annotate on your website wireframe to explain your template - Prototype, test, and iterate

What does a wireframe look like?

The website wireframe often contains some design elements as placeholders so designers at this stage can focus on the layout and page structure rather than the visual aspect of design. Most website wireframes also include a color palette.

When should you make a website wireframe?

You should make the website wireframe early on in the design process since it's a cheap and straightforward way to start working on visuals and is easily changeable. The initial website wireframe template is more about the layout itself; designs and content come at a later stage of the wireframing process.

Website Wireframing Template

Get started with this template right now. It’s free

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