InfographicInfographic

Infographic Template

Represent information in a visual way.

About the Infographic Template

Infographics are visual tools for representing information. They allow you to turn dry data into engaging stories. To help you understand a complex topic, infographics use imagery and text, ideally in a visually striking way. Infographics are great tools for making complicated information more comprehensible. Use them to give an overview of research findings, showcase survey data, raise awareness of an issue, summarize a topic, and much more.

Keep reading to learn more about Infographics, and how they can help your team!

What is an Infographic?

Every day, we’re surrounded and inundated by data. Whether you’re part of a business, a nonprofit, or an organization, you might find it difficult to get your readers, customers, and prospects interested in more data. How can you persuade them to pay attention to dry facts and statistics?

An infographic is a visual tool for communicating information. Creating an infographic allows you to turn quantitative or qualitative data into stories that resonate. Most infographics use some combination of text and visuals to break down a complicated topic. The best ones are creative and visually striking, catching the reader’s eye so they’re eager to learn more.

In general, infographics don’t contain very much text. Instead, they employ images, charts, and graphics to help the audience intuitively understand a topic. Designers use infographics to help tell complex stories in a more accessible way than if described by words alone.

When to use Infographics

Infographics are highly adaptable for any organization. Teams and individuals use infographics any time they want to summarize a topic or make it accessible to their readers. For example, marketing teams use infographics to liven up survey data or quantitative information in ad campaigns. Sales teams might use infographics to explain complex products to customers and prospects or to compare and contrast their organization’s services with a competitor’s. Nonprofits use infographics to raise awareness about complicated or systemic issues. The applications are endless.

Create your own Infographic

Making your own infographics is easy. Miro’s whiteboard tool is the perfect canvas to create and share them. Get started by selecting the Infographic Template, then take the following steps to make one of your own.

1. Determine your key takeaways. What do you want your audience to get out of the infographic? Often, teams create infographics to distill a lot of quantitative or qualitative information, like survey data or industry stats. But readers who are exposed to too much data at once tend to miss the point. To make the most of your infographic, take some time to decide on 3-5 main points that you’d like your audience to retain.

2. Decide on the story you want to tell. While your key takeaways are important, they’re not a story. The goal of an infographic is to guide your reader through a narrative, connecting the dots from your data to your thesis. Weave your 3-5 main points into a narrative. That will help you ensure you’re getting the point across, and it will help your design team create an infographic with visuals that resonate.

3. Draft the copy. Once you’ve decided on a narrative, it’s time to take the first crack at the text that will accompany your visuals. Even if you’re not a designer, we’ve provided three options to get you started depending on how much text you want to include.

4. Design the infographic. Now it’s time to use Miro’s template to implement your designs. The template makes it easy and intuitive to do it on your own, even if you’re not working with a design team or you don’t have a design background. Simply update the text, icons, and colors to make your own version.

5. Revise and iterate. In an infographic, text and visuals go hand in hand. As you work on the text, you’ll have a better idea of what you want it to look like. And as you design the images and charts, you’ll have further opportunities to sharpen and refine your text. Keep iterating until you’ve got a clear, cohesive story with striking visuals.

Infographic Template

Get started with this template right now. It’s free

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