Brand GuidelinesBrand Guidelines

Brand Guidelines Template

Identify and communicate your brand’s unique visual style and personality.

About the Brand Guidelines Template

What are brand guidelines?

When you think of your favorite companies, what do they have in common? For most of us, our favorite companies are defined by winning brands. The best brands are unique and instantly recognizable. They have a clear voice that informs the look and feel of their website, products and services, marketing copy, and even how problems are solved.

 But brands don’t appear out of thin air. Every great brand starts with documenting your unique brand guidelines to ensure consistency across the entire organization. These guidelines help flesh out the components that give your business its unique character. Brand guidelines should be flexible so your designers can have room to play but rigid enough to make your brand easily recognizable.

When to use Brand Guidelines

There’s never a wrong time to figure out your brand guidelines. For new businesses, brand guidelines are crucial to ensure consistency, establish trust, and foster brand recognition.

But not only new businesses can benefit from established brand guidelines. Treat them like a living document, and revisit your brand guidelines any time your brand needs refreshing: when you’re pushing into a new market, rebranding the organization, growing your business, or pivoting your product offerings.

Create your own brand guidelines

Making your own brand guidelines is easy using our simple template. Miro’s whiteboard tool is the perfect canvas to create and share it. Get started by selecting the Brand Guidelines Template, then take the following steps to make one of your own.

  1. Articulate your brand story and positioning statements. 

  2. Your brand story is the narrative stream that runs through all of your marketing materials. It helps your customers connect with your brand by taking them through a journey: how you got here, what problem your brand is solving, what motivates you, and what you hope to achieve.

  3. Connect with your customers.

  4.  Customers respond to brands on an emotional level. What emotions do you want your customers to feel when they interact with your brand? Does your brand inspire loyalty? Creativity? Excitement?

  5. Study your competitors. 

  6. What do their brands look like? Dig into their voice and tone; how they present their brand; and what their products, services, websites, and marketing materials look like. Your goal here isn’t to copy competitors but to keep in mind that potential customers will be consistently comparing you to similar businesses and seeing how you measure up. 

  7. Define your brand personality. 

  8. Think of your brand as a person. What are they like? How would you describe them to your friends? This brand personality will permeate everything you create. Once you nail it down, you can choose colors, fonts, photos, or other visual elements that align with your personality. Miro makes it easy to collaborate on your brand’s visual characteristics. Share graphics, talk through ideas, and iterate as a team.

Brand Guidelines Template

Get started with this template right now. It’s free

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