website-flowchart-web

Website Flowchart Template

Organize and clarify your website content with the Website Flowchart Template. Build user-centric experiences and have customers always coming back.

About the Website Flowchart Template

A website flowchart (also known as a sitemap) maps out the structure and complexity of your current or future website.

A well-structured sitemap or flowchart makes your website easily searchable. Each piece of content should ideally give users accurate search results, based on keywords connected to your web content.

Product, UX, and content teams use flowcharts or sitemaps to understand everything contained in a website, and plan to add or restructure content to improve a website’s user experience.

Keep reading to learn more about website flowcharts.

What is a website flowchart?

A website flowchart can be used as a planning tool to help organize and clarify existing content, and get rid of unnecessary or duplicate content. The flowchart also helps your team identify knowledge gaps for future content.

Website flowcharts help you stay focused on your user and your goals when working on website projects, from website launches, audits, or redesigns.

Ideally, your users shouldn’t be confused when navigating your website (whether it’s their first time or a returning visit), or interacting with any of your content. Website flowcharts help you spot areas of friction or dead-end points across user flows.

Create your own website flowchart

Making your own website flowchart is easy. Miro’s whiteboard tool is the perfect canvas to create and share them. Get started by selecting the Website Flowchart Template, then take the following steps to make one of your own.

1. Clarify your website’s purpose and goals

Websites should be focused and easy to navigate. Ask your team to articulate your website’s high-level goals and purpose on sticky notes. These can be broken down into specific, color-coded goals for each webpage. Your sitemap should help you determine whether every page on your website truly reinforces your goals.

2. Add website wireframes and set your website flow

You can build your website flowchart based on a website wireframe or build a quick mock-up with the shapes and images from our library. Make sure what you build is showing your user experience accurately and indicates flow direction with arrows.

3. Identify duplicate content and flag it for review

Use the number labels on each webpage to map out the user flow or rank the relevance of each website from highest to lowest possible. Flag duplicate content with relevant symbols like emojis to mark potential conflicting information or pages that don’t convert.

4. Streamline your conversion funnel

After you’ve finished adding the necessary new pages to your sitemap, map out and combine any duplicate steps a user must take to complete a sign-up or purchase. The fewer steps, the sooner your potential user can convert. In this step, it’s also helpful to build a customer touchpoint map.

5. Share your sitemap cross-functionally

Lots of people are involved in website launches, audits, or redesigns: from web designers, project managers, and developers, to copywriters, and sales and marketing (at least!). To align everyone on the goals and progress of your website project, keep the flowchart visible and easily accessible to all.

Why use a website flowchart?

A sitemap can help your product, UX, or content teams:

  • Clarify content themes or focuses so the user understands your products and services

  • Reduce broken links across your website

  • Streamline the conversion funnel so the user takes fewer steps before converting

  • Maintain higher search engine rankings by planning regular content refreshes to maintain a competitive edge

  • Kickstart a new business or initiative, especially since sitemaps help content get discovered faster

  • Invite cross-functional input and collaborate, as the needs of the users and website or content architecture evolve

  • Use your website flowchart as a web design project tracker, too. Keep an eye on finalized website elements, what areas need development, and how much your team progresses.

FAQ about website flowcharts

How do you create a flowchart for a website?

There are many ways to create a website flowchart, but some of the best practices include conducting user research to understand your customer’s pain points, and collaborating with other teams such as design, product, and development to assess what’s feasible or not. Finally, test your prototypes, to be sure your website flowchart is good, user-friendly, and will reach your company’s goals.

Website Flowchart Template

Get started with this template right now.

Related Templates
crazy-eights-thumb-web
Preview

Crazy Eights Template

Works best for:

Design Thinking, Brainstorming, Ideation

Sometimes you just need to get the team’s creative juices flowing for a brainstorm—and get them thinking of as many ideas as they can, as fast as they can. Crazy Eights will do it in a hurry. Favoring quantity over quality, this sketch brainstorming exercise challenges them to come up with eight ideas in eight minutes, which leaves no time to second guess ideas. It’s perfect for early stages of development, and it’s a team favorite for being fast paced and fun.

Crazy Eights Template
product-development-roadmap-thumb-web
Preview

Product Development Roadmap Template

Works best for:

Product Management, Software Development, Roadmaps

Product development roadmaps cover everything your team needs to achieve when delivering a product from concept to market launch. Your product development roadmap is also a team alignment tool that offers guidance and leadership to help your team focus on balancing product innovation and meeting your customer’s needs. Investing time in creating a roadmap focused on your product development phases helps your team communicate a vision to business leaders, designers, developers, project managers, marketers, and anyone else who influences meeting team goals.

Product Development Roadmap Template
Job Map Thumbnail
Preview

Job Map Template

Works best for:

Design, Desk Research, Mapping

Want to truly understand your consumers’ mindset? Take a look at things from their perspective — by identifying the “jobs” they need to accomplish and exploring what would make them “hire” or “fire” a product or service like yours. Ideal for UX researchers, job mapping is a staged process that gives you that POV by breaking the “jobs” down step by step, so you can ultimately offer something unique, useful, and different from your competitors. This template makes it easy to create a detailed, comprehensive job map.

Job Map Template
research-topic-brainstorm-thumb-web
Preview

Research Topic Brainstorm Template

Works best for:

Desk Research, Brainstorming, Ideation

Coming up with a topic for a research project can be a daunting task. Use the Research Topic Brainstorm template to take a general idea and transform it into something concrete. With the Research Topic Brainstorm template, you can compile a list of general ideas that interest you and then break them into component parts. You can then turn those parts into questions that might be the focus for a research project.

Research Topic Brainstorm Template
milestone-chart-thumb-web
Preview

Milestone Chart Template

Works best for:

Project Management, Strategic Planning, Project Planning

When your team is collaborating on a large project, keeping track of the many tasks and multiple timelines can be a challenge. That’s why you need a milestone chart. These visual representations of important project events will make it simple for your team to stay on schedule and reach goals on time. And it’s so easy to get started — just determine the major milestones, use our template to create a milestone chart, and define the key dates and deliverables each milestone will require.

Milestone Chart Template
user-interview-thumb-web (1)
Preview

User Interview Template

Works best for:

Desk Research, Product Management

A user interview is a UX research technique in which researchers ask the user questions about a topic. They allow your team to quickly and easily collect user data and learn more about your users. In general, organizations conduct user interviews to gather background data, to understand how people use technology, to take a snapshot of how users interact with a product, to understand user objectives and motivations, and to find users’ pain points. Use this template to record notes during an interview to ensure you’re gathering the data you need to create personas.

User Interview Template