SitemapSitemap

Sitemap Template

Lay out the hierarchical structure of your site in a simple and visual way.

About the Sitemap template

What is a sitemap?

Building a website is a complex task. Numerous stakeholders come together to create pages, write content, design elements, and build a website architecture that serves a target audience. 

A sitemap is an effective tool for simplifying the website design process. It allows you to take stock of the content and design elements you plan to include on your site. By visualizing your site, you can structure and build each component in a way that makes sense for your audience.

When to use a sitemap

You can use a sitemap when brainstorming and designing your website. This simple tool allows your team to visualize your website as you collaborate on building it.

Benefits of sitemaps

Why should you create a sitemap? Here are three ways you’ll benefit from investing time to make one of your own.

  • Easily collaborate with stakeholders. A sitemap makes it easier to have productive working sessions with stakeholders. It simplifies visualizing all the moving parts that go into building a website. Creating a sitemap gives you a convenient, effective visual tool for collaboration.

  • Share information. Using a sitemap makes it simpler to share information about the website that you’re building. Instead of trying to communicate in an email or in a meeting, you can simply convey the information by sketching it out on the map.

  • Save resources. Every time you make changes to a website or start over, you burn precious time and resources. A sitemap empowers you to take risks in a controlled environment. Test things out, see how they work, and iterate.

Get started with the Sitemap template

There are a variety of ways to construct a sitemap. Typically, sitemaps are visual 2D displays: lists or flowcharts that show connections between web pages, web page trees, and website content. Most teams choose to represent pages as blocks or cells, connected by lines representing the user’s pathway on the site.

This representation is simple to create and easy to understand. It allows designers, developers, content writers, and other stakeholders to plan website projects, collaborate, and share information.

Step 1: Get started by selecting this Sitemap template.

Step 2: Plan out the content you want on your website.

Step 3: Map out the steps needed to produce content and design. Your team can collaborate on these and other elements easily, using Miro’s simple tools!

Sitemap Template

Get started with this template right now. It’s free

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