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User Interview Template

Capture relevant details from discussions with current or potential customers.

About the User Interview template

What is a user interview?

User interviews are a UX research technique in which researchers ask the user questions about a topic. They allow your team to quickly and easily collect user data, and learn more about your users.

When to conduct user interviews 

In general, organizations conduct user interviews to gather background data, to understand how people use technology, to take a snapshot of how users interact with a product, to understand user objectives and motivations, and to find users’ pain points.

Who should implement the User Interview template

User interviews are generally conducted by two UX researchers, product managers, or other product team members. But, members of other departments (such as marketers developing user personas) may also wish to use this template. 

Benefits of conducting user interviews

What are the benefits of conducting user interviews? They allow researchers to understand the user experience, can give a clear picture of a product’s usability, and allow companies to gather demographic or ethnographic data that can be used to create user personas. 

How to structure your user interview

Start by explaining the purpose of the interview. Tell the interviewee what you plan to cover and what you’re trying to accomplish in the interview. Then explain how user data will be used afterward.

After this preamble, you can start asking your questions. Make sure you’re not priming the interviewee at any point during the conversation. For example, if you’re trying to figure out how people are using your podcast app, ask them, “Do you use any podcast apps?” rather than “How often are you using our podcast app?” Keep the interview short, under an hour.

At the end of the interview, thank the user for coming and give them the opportunity to ask any questions of their own.

Common user interview questions

  1. Tell me about your background.

  2. How often do you use [similar products in our space]?

  3. When you are using these products, do you encounter any challenges?

  4. What are the most important tasks you perform while using these products?

  5. Is there anything you wish you could do with these products, that is currently not possible?

  6. Is there any way these products do not support your current needs?

Set up your own User Interview template

The User Interview template is designed to capture the most relevant information from your user interviews. In addition to the details of the interview and interviewee, you may want to include questions asked and topics covered, as well as user observations and feedback, and key takeaways or action points for your team.

User Interview Template

Get started with this template right now. It’s free

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