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Low-fidelity Prototype Template

Turn high-level design concepts into testable artifacts.

About the Low Fidelity Prototype Template

Low fidelity prototypes help product and UX teams study product or service functionality by focusing on rapid iteration and user testing to inform future designs. Looking for a wireframe template that can be used as a blueprint for web pages or app screens? That sounds like a low fidelity wireframe. 

The focus on sketching and mapping out content, menus, and user flow allows both designers and non-designers to participate in the design and ideation process. Instead of producing linked interactive screens, low fidelity prototypes focus on insights about user needs, designer vision, and alignment of stakeholder goals. 

Keep reading to learn more about low fidelity prototypes.

What is a low fidelity prototype

Low fidelity prototypes serve as practical early visions of your product or service. These simple prototypes share only a few features with the final product. They are best for testing broad concepts and validating ideas. 

Low fidelity prototypes are also static and tend to be presented as screens, one by one. 

Each screen will look like a sketch or wireframe, with simple black-and-white illustrations. Instead of intricate details, each frame is filled with dummy content or labels, depending on what’s available. 

When to use low fidelity prototypes

Low fidelity prototypes are most useful when you need to test each design element: from workflows or conversion paths, to placement of visual elements or website engagement. 

Product managers and UX designers can use low fidelity prototypes when they need to:

  • Make design changes easily during the product testing phase

  • Encourage users to give honest feedback based on functionality, not design

  • Change design sketches quickly if ideas don’t work

  • Set realistic expectations with stakeholders, since sketches are unlikely to ship the next day

Low fidelity prototyping is becoming more popular because of the rise in design thinking advocacy and lean start-up methodologies (such as early validation and minimum viable product solutions that teams iterate on), and the collaborative and responsive approach of user-centered design. 

Create your own low fidelity prototype

Making your own low fidelity prototypes is easy. Miro’s whiteboard tool is the perfect canvas to create and share them. Get started by selecting the Low Fidelity Prototype Template, then take the following steps to make one of your own.

  1. Figure out your goals. Decide on core features you want to show your users. On a sticky note, list two or three core functionalities you plan to include in the low fidelity prototype. 

  2. Define your method based on your user and resources. The level of detail you include in your low fidelity prototype will depend on the answers to two questions: what type of user will be exposed to this prototype (and how can they deliver useful feedback)? What tools and resources are accessible to you? 

If you work in Adobe XD, you can use the 

 to add your artboards to Miro boards and collaborate with your team during the design process in Miro. 

  1. Execute your prototype. Don’t worry so much about form or function. Stick to the focus of your idea, and what you want to test with the user.

  2. Test your prototype. Help your users understand the aims of your prototype project, and ask probing questions. You can also draft a short welcome screen or guide alongside the prototype wireframes for your test users to read. You can solicit general feedback; or benefit perception, reactions, awareness, competitive advantage, or intention of use. 

  3. Learn from your prototype testing phase and repeat. Collect your users’ feedback and find the commonalities among their observations. These insights can be built into an 

     to spot patterns or similarities. You can repeat the testing phase with users as needed. Once you’ve incorporated user feedback into your low fidelity prototypes, you can then move on to building high fidelity prototypes. 

Low-fidelity Prototype Template

Get started with this template right now. It’s free

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