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Screen Flow Template

Validate visual screen components in a user flow.

About the Screen Flow Template

Screen flows (also known as “wireflows”) are a combination of wireframes and flowcharts. The end-to-end flow maps out what users see on each screen and how it impacts their decision-making process through your product or service. 

By thinking visually about what your customers are looking at, you can communicate with internal teams, stakeholders, and clients about the decisions you’ve made. You can also use a screen flow to find new opportunities to make the user experience frictionless and free of frustration from start to end. 

Want a template that can present user decisions without screens, in a text-and-symbols-style flowchart? That sounds like a User Flow Template.

Keep reading to learn more about screen flows.

What is a Screen Flow

A screen flow (or wireflow) brings together a multi-screen layout, connected like a flowchart to map out a customer’s decision-making points and movements from start to end. 

Wireframes on their own lack context for what an interactive, page-by-page user flow could look like. UX flows on their own are more abstract and can’t show you what your customer is actually looking at. 

Wireflows, or screenflows, combine the strengths of both methods and help you make a case for how what the user sees makes a high impact on how they experience your product or service. 

When to use Screen Flows

Wireframes help UX and product teams think of a customer journey as a full flow instead of a set of screens. 

A designer can map out a screen flow when they need to …

  • Make sure there are no missing scenarios: with an end-to-end journey mapped out, you can consider all the potential use cases that apply to the customer’s needs.

  • Improve user interactions: get to know your customer through every opportunity in the flow, such as sign-ups, confirmations, or popups.

  • Create better cross-functional communication: bring designers and developers together, encouraging them to think about the whole experience rather than separate screens.

  • Engage in stakeholder education: if clients or teams have never considered what the customer sees when moving through your product or experience, following a flow helps build empathy for customer pain points.

Create your own Screen Flow

Making your own screen flow is easy. Miro’s whiteboard tool is the perfect canvas to create and share them. Get started by selecting the Screen Flow Template, then take the following steps to make one of your own.

  1. Define your user story. Before you start mapping out a visual sequence, describe your user needs and pain points to be solved. This is your foundation to set up a starting point for your screen flow. 

  2. Decide what your key screens will show. Think through your start and endpoints in the journey. Do you need a landing page? Sign-up form screen? Confirmation page? Next, you want to identify a state change in each step of the process: would a form be split into multiple pages when asking for more information? In that case, each page is a separate design or screen that needs to be represented. Miro’s Wireframe Library has over 15 UI components, so feel free to add to existing template screens or build your own screens into the template.

  3. Connect the screens. Add and move arrows between each screen to move the user forward through the task, using Miro’s Connection Line tool. You can also include decision points and show what happens in every available instance to the user. 

  4. Share with your team or stakeholders for feedback. You can use Miro’s Mention feature to tag your team or individual people for quick feedback rounds, design critiques, or reviews before live workshop sessions with clients. You can also share your Miro Board with anyone (even if they’re not already registered!) by clicking the Invite Members button.

Screen Flow Template

Get started with this template right now. It’s free

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