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HEART Template

Measure the user experience on a large scale.

About the HEART template

What is the HEART framework?

For user experience teams, developing useful metrics for success can be a challenge. This is even truer for teams at large companies. When you want to measure user experience on a small scale, you need only to observe users, give them surveys, interview them, and run focus groups. But as your company grows, these methods become untenable.

That’s why Google developed the HEART framework. The HEART framework delivers user-centric metrics that allow you to measure user experience at scale. You can then draw on these metrics throughout the product development lifecycle. THough the HEART framework was specifically designed for large-scale measurement, the same principles work just as well on a smaller scale.

What does HEART stand for?

HEART stands for Happiness, Engagement, Adoption, Retention, and Task Success. Happiness is a measure of attitude or satisfaction, which is often measured through some type of user survey. Engagement measures how much a user interacts with a product of their own volition and is measured by different metrics depending on the product. Adoption is the number of new users over time. Retention measures the amount of time you’re able to keep customers. Task Success may be measured in the time it takes to complete a task or in the percentage of successful completions of a task once it’s begun.

How do you create a HEART model?

Step 1

The HEART model uses five measures: happiness, engagement, adoption, retention, and task success. However, you won’t always need to make use of all five measures for every project. Start by choosing which measures will be most useful for this project.

Step 2

The Y axis of your HEART model is the five measures. The X axis is Goals, Signals, and Metrics. Prepare to fill out each.

Step 3

Fill out Happiness. Happiness captures user satisfaction. Most people use a survey to gauge user satisfaction. 

Step 4

Fill out Engagement. Engagement measures how often a user interacts with a product or service. It might capture how regularly they use the product, the period of time in which they use it, or intensity. 

Step 5

Fill out Adoption. Adoption is the number of new users who use your product or service in a given time period. This is useful because it allows you to understand how well you are capturing new business.

Step 6

Fill out Retention. Conversely, Retention measures how many customers you are keeping for a certain amount of time. If you’re seeing a significant drop in customers at a certain time period, you might want to examine other time scales to see what UX issues might lead to churn.

Step 7

Fill out Task Success. Task Success varies from team to team. Some choose to examine the time users spend on a given task. Other analyze the percentage of users who complete a given task.

When should you use the HEART model?

The HEART model is generally used to measure larger scale projects, but it can also be used for smaller projects. You may just want to make some adjustments to the specifics of the metrics you’re measuring or your data collection methods for smaller-scale projects.

HEART Template

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