change-control-process-webchange-control-process-web

Change Control Process Template

Approve and manage various requests for changes to a system or product.

About the Change Control Process template

What is a Change Control Process?

Change control is an integral part of project management. Most projects face the prospect of change at some point during their lifecycle. While the change might be necessary, it might also be difficult to implement on the fly.

A change control process defines the steps that must be taken in order to change the scope of a project. It documents the proposed change and ensures it is reviewed and improved prior to implementation.

Why use the Change Control Process template?

The change control process template helps define a proposed change and ensures it is reviewed prior to implementation. As such, it allows your team to veto a change that might prove unnecessary or disruptive. If you do need to make the proposed change, the change control process allows you to use your resources to implement the change effectively.

When do you use a Change Control process?

Create a change control process at the beginning of a project, so everyone is aware of what to do if a plan needs to be modified.

The 5 elements of a Change Control process

  1. Proposal - The proposal for a change must include a description of the change and the expected benefits. Most organizations allow employees or customers to submit change requests through a Change Request Form, which is then added to a Change Log for the project.

  2. Summary of impact - The project manager then considers the expected impact of the change. Will the change save money? Is the change too costly? How does the change impact your timeline? Is there a legal reason for the change? How does the change introduce new risk to the business?

  3. Decision - The project manager and an approved authority go over the change. They consider all information and either accept or reject the proposal. If they accept, they might request revisions to the change.

  4. Implementation - If the change is approved, it must be planned, scheduled, and executed.

  5. Review - After the change is implemented, most project managers sit down with stakeholders and hold a retrospective. Did the change go as planned? How could it have gone better?

Change Control Process Template

Get started with this template right now. It’s free

Related Templates
Porters Five Forces ThumbnailPorters Five Forces Thumbnail
Preview

Porter's Five Forces

Developed by Harvard Business School professor Michael Porter, Porter’s Five Forces has become one of the most popular and highly regarded business strategy tools available for teams. Use Porter’s Five Forces to measure the strength of your current competition and decide which markets you might be able to move into. Porter’s Five Forces include: supplier power, buyer power, rivalry among existing competitors, the threat of substitute products or services, the threat of substitute products and services, and the threat of new entrants.

Porter's Five Forces
sipoc-thumb-websipoc-thumb-web
Preview

SIPOC

A SIPOC diagram maps a process at a high level by identifying the potential gaps between suppliers and input specifications and between customers and output specifications, and thereby defines the scope of process improvement activities. The acronym SIPOC stands for Suppliers (sources), Input, Process, Output, and Customers. SIPOC identifies feedback and feed-forward loops between customers, suppliers, and the processes, and jump-starts the team to think in terms of cause and effect. Use this visual tool to document the working process from beginning to end.

SIPOC
swot-analysis-thumb-webswot-analysis-thumb-web
Preview

SWOT Analysis

When you’re developing a business strategy, it can be hard to figure out what to focus on. A SWOT analysis helps you hone in on key factors. SWOT stands for Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats. Strengths and weaknesses are internal factors, like your employees, intellectual property, marketing strategy, and location. Opportunities and threats are usually external factors, like market fluctuations, competition, prices of raw materials, and consumer trends. Conduct a SWOT analysis whenever you want to explore opportunities for new businesses and products, decide the best way to launch a product, unlock your company’s potential, or use your strengths to develop opportunities.

SWOT Analysis
Agile-roadmap-thumb-webAgile-roadmap-thumb-web
Preview

Agile Roadmap

An Agile product roadmap is an action plan for how a product will become a solution and evolve over time. Agile product roadmaps focus on desired goals, outcomes, and context for daily productivity rather than features and timelines. Multiple teams often share the Agile product roadmap as a visual reference to prioritize tasks and stay aligned with the rest of the team. Product owners, managers, and Agile Scrum masters can use Agile roadmaps to align with their teams, track progress, prioritize their product backlog, and keep both internal and external stakeholders updated about any changes.

Agile Roadmap
startup-canvas-thumb-web (1)startup-canvas-thumb-web (1)
Preview

Startup Canvas

A Startup Canvas helps founders express and map out a new business idea in a less formal format than a traditional business plan. Startup Canvases are a useful visual map for founders who want to judge their new business idea’s strengths and weaknesses. This Canvas can be used as a framework to quickly articulate your business idea’s value proposition, problem, solution, market, team, marketing channels, customer segment, external risks, and Key Performance Indicators. By articulating factors like success, viability, vision, and value to the customer, founders can make a concise case for why a new product or service should exist and get funded.

Startup Canvas
Lean UX Canvas ThumbnailLean UX Canvas Thumbnail
Preview

Lean UX Canvas

What are you building, why are building it, and who are you building it for? Those are the big pictures questions that guide great companies and teams toward success — and Lean UX helps you find the answers. Especially helpful during project research, design, and planning, this tool lets you quickly make product improvements and solve business problems, leading to a more customer-centric product. This template will let you create a Lean UX canvas structured around eight key elements: Business problem, Business outcome, Users and customers, User benefits, Solution ideas, Hypothesis, Assumptions, Experimentation.

Lean UX Canvas