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Change Control Process Template

Approve and manage various requests for changes to a system or product.

About the Change Control Process template

What is a Change Control Process?

Change control is an integral part of project management. Most projects face the prospect of change at some point during their lifecycle. While the change might be necessary, it might also be difficult to implement on the fly.

A change control process defines the steps that must be taken in order to change the scope of a project. It documents the proposed change and ensures it is reviewed and improved prior to implementation.

Why use the Change Control Process template?

The change control process template helps define a proposed change and ensures it is reviewed prior to implementation. As such, it allows your team to veto a change that might prove unnecessary or disruptive. If you do need to make the proposed change, the change control process allows you to use your resources to implement the change effectively.

When do you use a Change Control process?

Create a change control process at the beginning of a project, so everyone is aware of what to do if a plan needs to be modified.

The 5 elements of a Change Control process

  1. Proposal - The proposal for a change must include a description of the change and the expected benefits. Most organizations allow employees or customers to submit change requests through a Change Request Form, which is then added to a Change Log for the project.

  2. Summary of impact - The project manager then considers the expected impact of the change. Will the change save money? Is the change too costly? How does the change impact your timeline? Is there a legal reason for the change? How does the change introduce new risk to the business?

  3. Decision - The project manager and an approved authority go over the change. They consider all information and either accept or reject the proposal. If they accept, they might request revisions to the change.

  4. Implementation - If the change is approved, it must be planned, scheduled, and executed.

  5. Review - After the change is implemented, most project managers sit down with stakeholders and hold a retrospective. Did the change go as planned? How could it have gone better?

Change Control Process Template

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