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SWOT Analysis Template

Analyze your company’s strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats.

About the SWOT Analysis template

The SWOT Analysis template is where you can map out the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats of your business, project, or product launch. This tool is perfect for exploring more profound aspects of your business and for you to inform decisions better when it comes to strategies, action plans, and your project's next steps.

Keep reading to know more about the SWOT Analysis template.

What is a SWOT analysis?

When you’re developing a business strategy, it can be hard to figure out what to focus on. A SWOT analysis template helps you hone in on key factors. 

SWOT stands for Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats. Strengths and weaknesses are internal factors, like your employees, intellectual property, marketing strategy, and location. Opportunities and threats, by contrast, are usually external factors, like market fluctuations, competition, prices of raw materials, and consumer trends. 

How to use a blank SWOT Analysis template 

The blank SWOT Analysis template will consist of four blocks of content, built in a simple two-by-two grid, each containing one key analysis area. To organize your work visually, you can color code the blocks, so you and your team can quickly identify them.

Suppose you want to deepen your SWOT analysis. In that case, you can also have additional blocks containing more details about the strategies you want to develop to tackle the weaknesses or keep your team’s strengths.

Create your own SWOT analysis template

SWOT analysis is easy, using Miro’s simple template. When conducting a SWOT analysis, your team will look at ways to develop strengths (SO), minimize weaknesses (WO), prevent threats (ST), and track potential dangers (WT).

Miro’s whiteboard tool is the perfect canvas to create and share your SWOT analysis. Get started by selecting this SWOT Analysis template. Then, follow these steps:

  1. List your organization’s Strengths: what do users like best about your product or process? What do you do better than competitors? What unique advantages does your organization have?

  2. Find your company’s Weaknesses: what problems or complaints do you hear most from customers? What do you see as your biggest current obstacles? What advantages do your competitors have that your company does not yet have?

  3. Next, list Opportunities you can potentially pursue: how can you improve your customer service? What messaging resonates most with your users? Are there resources or tools you could further leverage to your advantage?

  4. Threats can be wide-ranging: specific or emerging competitors, high staff turnover, or market volatility, for instance.

About the SWOT Analysis template

What is an example of a SWOT analysis template in Miro?

The SWOT analysis template in Miro has an easy-to-use format, and it can be customizable according to your needs. You can keep it simple by adding the key four areas of the SWOT analysis, or you can add more blocks and deep dive into your organization’s weaknesses and strengths.

How do I write a SWOT Analysis?

Determine the objectives of your SWOT analysis: what do you want to get out of it? What problem are you trying to solve? Who are the stakeholders, and how can you address the issues that might come to the surface? After you defined your overall objective, you can go into detail and perform the SWOT analysis focusing on the four key areas: Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats.

SWOT Analysis Template

Get started with this template right now. It’s free

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