PresentationPresentation

Presentation Template

Deliver presentations that resonate with your audience.

About the Presentation Template

At some point during your career, you’ll probably have to give a presentation. For many of us, it can be stressful—but it doesn’t have to be! Using our Presentation Template, you can easily create effective, visually appealing slides. Add text, visuals, graphics—whatever you need.

Keep reading to learn more about our Presentation Template, and how it can help you and your team!

What is the Presentation Template

Presentations typically involve speaking alongside an accompanying slide deck containing visuals, text, and graphics that illustrate your topic. For most of us, presenting can be a nerve-wracking experience – but it doesn’t have to be if you have the right tools.

The Presentation Template can boost your confidence by helping you give effective presentations. Using simple tools, create a visually appealing presentation that keeps your audience focused and engaged. If you’re making a slide deck with a team, you can share your slides, get feedback, and collaborate without missing a beat. Use the Presentation Template to save time and allow you to focus on your content.

When to use the Presentation Template

Use the Presentation template whenever you need to create a presentation. If you’re a seasoned pro, you’ll love using the template to customize your slide deck. Or if you’re a newbie, the template will increase your confidence as a communicator by making it easier to create an inspired, memorable slide deck that leaves you feeling capable and prepared to present.

Create your own presentation

Making your own presentation is easy. Miro’s whiteboard tool is the perfect canvas to create and share with your collaborators. Get started by selecting the Presentation Template, then take the following steps to make one of your own.

  1. Brainstorm what you want to get out of your presentation. What would you like your audience to come away with? Don’t worry about specifics. At the brainstorming stage, just write down anything that comes to mind.

  2. Define your audience. Who are they? Will they know anything about your topic, or will you need to start from scratch? Defining your audience is a crucial part of building your presentation because it will shape everything from the design of your slide deck to the level of detail with which you explain your topic.

  3. Figure out your setting. What’s the context of this presentation? Will it be to an all-hands meeting? A conference? The setting will help you determine how technical the presentation should be, how long you should speak, how formal you should be, and much more.

  4. Outline your presentation. Treat it like an essay. You’ll want to start with an introduction, lay out 3-5 main points, then conclude. Include as many details as you’d like; you can always cut down your word count later.

  5. Draft the text that will appear on your slides. Start adding information from your outline onto the slides themselves.

  6. Get creative with the visuals! Dress up your slide deck with photos, icons, charts, and other images. Make sure the slides are easy to read but don’t be afraid to have fun with them. Visuals are a great way to keep your audience engaged.

  7. Share your slide deck with collaborators for feedback.

  8. Practice your presentation in front of an audience. It can be difficult to tell which aspects of the presentation are clunky, unclear, or dull unless you actually give the presentation. Treat this practice as a dress rehearsal. Run through the slide deck as though you’re at your meeting or conference. If appropriate, give your audience time to ask questions.

  9. Invite your audience to give you feedback. Keep refining it until you’ve got a clear, concise presentation that shines!

Presentation Template

Get started with this template right now. It’s free

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