Porters Five ForcesPorters Five Forces

Porter's Five Forces Template

Estimate your competition and develop a business strategy.

About Porter's Five Forces template

What are the Porter's Five Forces?

  1. Supplier power: this force is an assessment of how easy it is for suppliers to drive prices up. It’s typically completed by determining the number of suppliers who can offer the same supply, the cost of switching suppliers, and any unique aspects of benefits the supplier can offer.

  2. Buyer power: Next, you determine how easy it is for buyers to drive prices down. This is determined by the total number of buyers your business has, customer acquisition cost, customer lifetime value, and other factors that may give the buyer (customers) leverage to negotiate for lower prices, or go elsewhere.

  3. Rivalry among existing competitors: The main drivers of this force are the number of and capability of competitors in the market. More numerous and powerful competitors with larger market share diminishes the power of any one smaller company, and gives both customers and suppliers more leverage (because of their ability to go elsewhere).

  4. Threat of substitute products/services: When close substitute products exist in a market, it increases the likelihood of customers switching to alternative products in response to price increases.

  5. Threat of new entrants: Profitable markets attract new entrants, which in turn erodes profitability. Unless incumbents have strong and durable barriers to new entrants, profitability will decline. Conversely, the more unique your product is from other competitors, the less threat is posed by new entrants.

Why is Porter's Five Forces analysis important?

Porter’s Five Forces forces model is useful because it can provide insight on various parts of a business:

  • Determine the factors affecting profitability: Completing a Five Forces analysis will help a business understand the specific factors that may be hindering growth or profitability, and then find new competitive advantages.

  • Make better decisions on expansion or capacity: If you’re considering expanding your business in some way, you’ll want to understand the competitive forces at play and how they may affect you. A Five Forces analysis provides organizations with the information to make good decisions relating to entering a specific industry, or whether to increase.

  • Inform your overall strategy: By understanding what shapes the overall market and what determines profitability, you can craft a strategy that plays to the strengths of your industry and accounts for the weaknesses.

How to Use Porter’s 5 Forces

With Miro’s Five Forces analysis template, you can easily complete the analysis on your own. Here’s how you do it:

Step 1: Consider threats of new entry

How easily could others enter your market and threaten your company’s position? Who are your new competitors? How much does it cost to enter your market? What are the barriers to entry? Is your market tightly regulated? What does it take to scale?

Think about the amount of competition your company faces: the number of competitors you have and how their products or services compare to yours. If your market has few competitors, that can seem attractive, but keep in mind it might be short-lived. If your market is highly competitive, that can seem unattractive, but it might push you to improve your products and your pricing.

Step 2: Consider threats of substitution

What is the likelihood that your customers will replace your product or service with a different one? Are there any viable substitutes on the market? What is the cost of switching to a substitute? 

When you map out threats of substitution, analyze how your product has impacted your customers’ lives. As their behavior changes, see if you can adapt your product accordingly. You might be able to offer a new service or a cheaper alternative.

Step 3: Consider the bargaining power of suppliers

What would happen if your suppliers increased their prices? Is that likely to happen? How easily could you switch to an alternative supplier? 

It’s important to keep in mind that your supplier is a business too. They are performing the same strategic calculations that you are. If your supplier offers a niche service, they could charge you more and impact your bottom line.

Step 4: Consider the bargaining power of buyers

How many buyers do you have? Could your buyers switch suppliers? How many would need to switch suppliers to impact your bottom line? How important is your product or service to your buyers?

Like your supplier, your buyers’ calculations could seriously impact your bottom line too. These questions help you figure out how much leverage your buyers have. Even if your buyers are not businesses, it’s important to treat them that way. They are business-savvy, often shopping around to see how your competitors measure up.

Step 5: Consider competitive rivalries.

Who are your existing competitors? How strong are they? How do their products or services compare to yours? What sets your company apart? What would it cost your customer to switch to a competitor?

Draw out your current competitive landscape. Understand how your competitors are succeeding and why they’re failing. Many businesses make the mistake of only analyzing what makes them better than their competition. It is crucial to understand what makes your competition better than you. Be honest! It’s the only way you can get ahead.

Porter's Five Forces Template

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