four-actions-framework-webfour-actions-framework-web

Blue Ocean 4 Actions Framework Template

Break the value-cost trade-off and create a blue ocean with four central questions.

About the Blue Ocean 4 Actions Framework template

Who created Blue Ocean 4 Actions Template

Blue Ocean 4 Actions Template was created by W. Chan Kim and Renée Mauborgne. They are Professors of Strategy at INSEAD, one of the world’s top business schools, and co-directors of the INSEAD Blue Ocean Strategy Institute in Fontainebleau, France. Together, they wrote a best-selling book 

.  

Why use the 4 Actions template?

The 4 Actions Template can help you assess whether you are spending money in the correct ways around your product to maximize user gain and minimize user pain. Identify the pains that really matter for your product and the gains that really matter with this template. This way, you are getting the most value with the least cost within the total product market.

When to use the Blue Ocean 4 Actions Template

The Four Actions Framework is most useful when you help create value innovation and break the value-cost trade-off. W. Chan Kim and Renée Mauborgne 

 terms red and blue oceans to describe the market universe. They say that ‘red oceans are all the industries in existence today—the known market space.’ In the red oceans, industry boundaries are defined and accepted, and the competitive rules of the game are known. As the market space gets crowded, prospects for profits and growth are reduced. Blue oceans, in contrast, denote all the industries not in existence today—the unknown market space, untainted by competition. In blue oceans, demand is created rather than fought over. So the Blue Ocean 4 Actions Template is a great tool to consider when you feel like your company or your product is stuck in the ‘red ocean’ and you are looking for the ways to innovate. 

How do you use the 4 Actions template?

Step 1: Eliminate 

In each column, it’s important to ask questions about the industry standards among your product space. First, ask yourself, which factors that the industry has long competed on should be eliminated? Think of the factors that require a lot of investment and effort, but don’t bring a lot of revenue/new customers and, in general, don’t drive key metrics up. These can also be the factors that made more sense in the past but are not as useful now — for example, a feature of differentiated a digital product in the past but became obsolete as time passed. 

Step 2: Reduce

Which factors should be reduced well below the industry’s standard? Think of the features/characteristics of your product that are well designed to beat the competition but take to much time and resources. Can you strip this down to something more simple but still competitive and relevant to your users?

Step 3: Raise

Which factors should be raised well above the industry’s standard? What are the pain points that the market does not address? Think of the way you can build features that will help your customers solve challenges that other companies are not solving.  

Step 4: Create 

Which factors should be created that the industry has never offered? This is one of the most challenging questions and it requires a deep understanding of your customers’ interests and desires, as well as a good insight into where the industry is going. The goal is to think about the future and the challenges customers haven’t articulated yet. 

Blue Ocean 4 Actions Framework Template

Get started with this template right now. It’s free

Related Templates
lesson-reflection-thumb-weblesson-reflection-thumb-web
Preview

Lesson Reflection

The Lesson Reflection template is a tool to create space for self-reflection and improvement. Students can evaluate the key takeaways from a lesson and what are the topics they find most interesting. As teachers receive the student’s Lesson Reflection, they can look for opportunities to improve learning and teaching methodologies. The Lesson Reflection template can help you facilitate the educational process, and it’s easy to use and straightforward.

Lesson Reflection
T-Chart ThumbnailT-Chart Thumbnail
Preview

T-Chart

T-Charts can help you compare and contrast two different ideas, group information into different categories, and prove a change through “before” and “after” analysis. T-Charts are visual organizational tools that enable you to compare ideas, so you can evaluate pros and cons, facts and opinions, strengths and weaknesses, or big-picture views versus specific details. Designers and content creators can use T-Charts to turn possibilities into actionable ideas. T-Charts are useful for discussing differences and similarities with your team or clients and can help you to reach a decision together.

T-Chart
2×2 Prioritization Matrix-thumb2×2 Prioritization Matrix-thumb
Preview

2x2 Prioritization Matrix

Ready to set boundaries, prioritize your to-dos, and determine just what features, fixes, and upgrades to tackle next? The 2x2 prioritization matrix is a great place to start. Based on the lean prioritization approach, this template empowers teams with a quick, efficient way to know what's realistic to accomplish and what’s crucial to separate for success (versus what’s simply nice to have). And guess what—making your own 2x2 prioritization matrix is easy.

2x2 Prioritization Matrix
cisco-recommended-security-architecture-thumb (1)cisco-recommended-security-architecture-thumb (1)
Preview

Cisco Recommended Security Architecture

Cisco offers data center and access networking solutions built for scale with industry-leading automation, programmability, and real-time visibility. The Cisco Recommended Security Architecture uses Cisco elements to visually show the network design of Cisco networks.

Cisco Recommended Security Architecture
Affinity Diagram ThumbnailAffinity Diagram Thumbnail
Preview

Affinity Diagram

You can use an affinity diagram to generate, organize, and consolidate information that comes out of a brainstorming session. Whether you’re building a product, working through a complex problem, establishing a process, or piecing apart an issue, an affinity diagram is a useful and simple framework that gives each team member the opportunity to pitch in and share their thoughts. But it’s not just ideal for brainstorms—this is a great template and tool when you need to reach consensus or analyze data such as survey results.

Affinity Diagram
design-sprint-kit-thumb-webdesign-sprint-kit-thumb-web
Preview

Design Sprint Kit

With the right focused and strategic approach, five days is all it takes to address your biggest product challenges. That’s the thinking behind Design Sprint methodology. Created by Tanya Junell of Blue Label Labs, this Design Sprint Kit provides a set of lightweight templates that support the Design Sprint’s collaborative activities and voting—and maintains the energy, team spirit, and momentum that was sparked in the session. Virtual sprint supplies and prepared whiteboards make this kit especially useful for remote Design Sprint Facilitators.

Design Sprint Kit