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DMAIC Analysis Template

Develop a roadmap with DMAIC to solve problems using a structured approach.

About the DMAIC template

What is a DMAIC analysis?

DMAIC (define, measure, analyze, improve, and control) is a data-driven quality strategy that many organizations use to improve processes. While it was developed as part of the Six Sigma initiative, the method has been widely adopted as a quality improvement procedure.

When to use DMAIC

DMAIC is a useful tool for any organization, whenever you want to improve quality. Look for process opportunities with the greatest impact and most manageable effort, that still align with your organizational strategy.

Benefits of using DMAIC

The DMAIC problem-solving method can drive significant improvements in an organization. It represents a five-step plan that your organization can follow to resolve issues using a streamlined approach.

The 5 factors of DMAIC

DMAIC is an acronym of the five main steps in the process: Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, and Control. All of the DMAIC process steps are required, always following the order below. 

  1. Define: Start by defining your team’s problem or goal. Seek out a more obvious problem, with an existing process. Be as specific as possible. The more specific you are, the easier it will be to solve each concrete problem and complete the project.

  2. Measure: After you define the project or problem, figure out how you plan to measure it. What key metrics can you track? How will you know whether you have succeeded? 

  3. Analyze: Once you’ve determined the measurements you need, collect your data and analyze it. The purpose of this step is to identify a problem’s root causes. Then, list and prioritize potential causes of the problem, prioritize root causes or key process inputs to pursue in the Improve step, and identify how process inputs affect process outputs.

  4. Improve: By the time you reach this step, your team’s analysis likely has pointed to a possible solution to your process. Solutions should be impactful, but not overly complicated. Examine the results and make sure there are no consequences to the selected solution. If you find potential consequences, you might have to go back to the Measure or Analyze steps.

  5. Control: After the implementation stage, you need to Control the process. Monitor the improvements and adjust as needed, to ensure continued and sustainable success.

Create your own DMAIC

Making your team’s own DMAIC is easy, using Miro’s simple template. It’s the perfect canvas for creating and sharing your analysis. Get started by selecting this DMAIC template. You can easily customize it to your team’s specific needs, and share with team members, located anywhere.

DMAIC Analysis Template

Get started with this template right now. It’s free

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