Daily StandupDaily Standup

Daily Standup Template

Run a quick daily check-in meeting for your team to plan the day’s work.

About the daily standup template

What is a daily standup template?

This template is for use by a scrum team to coordinate on daily workload and make sure everyone is aware of impediments. Everyone who is working on a sprint needs to participate.

What do you do in a daily standup?

This template is for use by a scrum team to coordinate on daily workload and make sure everyone is aware of impediments. Everyone who is working on a sprint needs to participate.

Why do companies do daily standups?

Foster collaboration - Daily standups are a great way to promote collaboration between members of your team. Employees get an opportunity to bring up issues, roadblocks, and bottlenecks so their teammates can jump in and offer to help.

Capture and share knowledge - A cadence of daily standups can help plug knowledge gaps and make sure everyone is communicating. Standups ensure the team has a better idea of what everyone else is working on and how they can help.  

Reduce roadblocks - Standups allow employees to identify issues before they become more serious. When someone mentions an issue, teammates can suggest better ways for completing a task. If teammates don’t feel comfortable discussing roadblocks, this can point to deeper problems with processes, functions, or morale. Supervisors can then take a step back to address these underlying issues.

Share goals and objectives - Daily standups provide a forum for people to share individual and team goals. Supervisors can make sure everyone understands the goals they are working toward. They can also adjust goals if necessary.

What happens during a daily standup?

The daily standup meeting should last no more than 15 minutes. During the standup, each team member should answer three questions: What have they done since the last meeting? What are they going to do until the next meeting? Do they have any impediments that keep them from accomplishing their tasks?

How to create your standup schedule

1 - Set a time and place. Poll your team to learn whether they prefer morning standups or end-of-day meetings. Standups should become a useful part of everyone’s routine, setting the stage of their day or wrapping up at the end.

2 - Create an agenda. Standup meetings should not run any longer than it takes someone to start fidgeting while standing up! In general, aim for ten or fifteen minutes. To stay on task, create a quick agenda that sketches out what you hope to accomplish.

3 - Stick to the same format. Once you’ve nailed down your time and place, come up with some questions that you hope to answer during each meeting. Many standups aim to answer the following three questions: What have I accomplished since our last standup? What do I hope to accomplish before the next one? What obstacles might keep me from doing so? 

Daily Standup Template

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