Visual Story MapVisual Story Map

Visual Story Map Template

Follow a step-by-step process to plan out your story.

About the Visual Story Mapping template

How does Visual Story Mapping add depth to your ideas?

Some people like to think of a visual story map as a stylized to-do list, but it’s a lot more powerful than that. Visual story mapping allows your product management team to visualize multiple dimensions of information. In doing so, you can identify how these parts will come together to create a successful whole. Use the visual story map template to make sure your product managers are aligned and to create a single source of truth about your projects.

What are the 4 benefits of using a Visual Story Map?

  1. See the entire project from start to finish. When planning out a project, it can be difficult to visualize it from beginning to end. Visual story maps give you a holistic view of the project: types of tasks, or “stories,” you must undertake to finish it, story viability, how stories unfold over a timeline, how stories are prioritized, and when you can expect each story to be finished. The visual story map brings everything together on the page.

  2. Foster collaboration. Story mapping enhances your understanding of a project by giving you a complete picture. That’s why a visual story map is a great tool for encouraging collaboration within and across teams. Use the visual story map template to assign stakeholders, give people ownership over their responsibilities, scope out projects, share learnings, and brainstorm.

  3. Conduct gap analysis. Once you’ve mapped out your product management tasks as a visual story, it becomes easier to identify missing elements. Your teams can then get together to add solutions to the workflow, brainstorm ideas, and identify missing features. The visual story map allows you to see these elements before they impact your customer and bottom line.

  4. Plan out timelines. Visual story mapping helps you think about how one aspect of your project flows into another. You can use this knowledge to figure out how long your project will take. This makes it easier to define your scope, assign roles, and budget accordingly.

What does CAST stand for?

Content row: A lot of presentations have too much content that is not relevant to the decision or to the aim of the presentation. The content must lead the audience to understand why and what they must do.

Audience row: You need to understand your audience needs and motivation. What do they need to know? How can you motivate them to take the desired action?

Story row: When you are clear about the content and your audience, you can focus on the story structure. Using the format of a story, rather than simply adding text to your presentation, makes it easy for your audience to listen to you and become involved.

Tell row: Create the words and visuals to focus on the telling of the story. Work out how the story will be conveyed in different formats and test that it has the intended impact.

CAST is understandable for everyone, and breaks down the effort needed to produce a visual story into discrete steps that any professional can follow. Try it!

Visual Story Map Template

Get started with this template right now. It’s free

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