Meeting NotesMeeting Notes

Meeting Notes Template

Create a lasting record of what happened during a meeting.

About the Meeting Notes template

What are meeting notes?

If someone asked you how many meetings you have in a given week, you’d probably find it hard to answer -- not because you don’t pay attention, but because you have so many! When you’re in and out of important meetings all day, it can be difficult to remember who said what, or what goals everyone agreed on.

Meeting notes are simply a record of your meeting. Most teams prefer to assign a notetaker at the beginning of each meeting, so one person can focus on capturing the contents of the meeting instead of having everyone scramble to capture what they can. Many teams rotate the notetaker so everyone has an equal stake in the meeting.

Who should use the meeting notes template?

Any team that wants to keep a written record of what happened during a meeting. This is especially important for meetings with action items, deadlines, and decisions. You can assign one person to be responsible or you may want to rotate duties so that a different person is responsible for updating the meeting notes each time. 

How to create meeting notes

Step 1: Assign a notetaker before the meeting.

Step 2: Decide on the topics you’re going to cover for the meeting. The notetaker can make a note of these topics.

Step 3: During the meeting, ask the notetaker to summarize the notes from the previous meeting to give you a starting point.

Step 4: Have the notetaker take down the names of the participants, agenda times, action items and due dates, and the main points from the meeting.

Step 5: As the meeting continues, the notetaker can continue to take note of any decisions made by the participants, the most important points covered, and any future decisions that need to be made.

Step 6: The notetaker can share the meeting notes with the team, if appropriate.

How do you use the meeting notes template?

Start with our pre-made template, making any changes you’d like to suit your particular needs. Invite team members to join your board and collaborate. Use the @mention or video chat if you need to get input from others. You can upload other file types such as documents, photos, videos, and PDFs to store all the relevant information in one place. 

Meeting Notes Template

Get started with this template right now. It’s free

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