Look Mock AnalyzeLook Mock Analyze

Look Mock Analyze Template

Discover inspiration, mock up designs, and get feedback.

About the Look, Mock, Analyze template

What is a Look, Mock, Analyze analysis?

Look, Mock, Analyze is a tool that allows you to discover inspiration, mock up designs, and get feedback. When developing a new product or starting work on a new design, it is crucial for you to understand not only what customers want and to communicate your vision—it is equally important to learn what has been already done. This can help you find common patterns and gather additional inspiration.

Benefits of using mock analysis

This simple but effective tool allows you and your team to identify your strengths and weaknesses, where you went wrong (or did well), and whether you spent time efficiently during your design process. It gives your team a broad idea on where to best focus work and make improvements.

When to use this mock analysis 

To simplify the design research process, Miro has created the Look, Mock, Analyze framework. This simple template helps your team structure your research process when building a design concept. Conduct research, gather references, sketch some ideas, and analyze the result. It’s that simple.

Create your own Look, Mock, Analyze analysis

Miro’s simple whiteboard tool is the perfect canvas to help you create and share your mock analysis. Follow these 3 easy steps:

Step 1: Select this Look, Mock, Analyze template and set up your board in less than a minute.

Step 2: Add screenshots from the web using Chrome Extension or the Capture web page feature to collect your visual references.

Step 3: Add your own design ideas to the board and collaborate with your team.

Look Mock Analyze Template

Get started with this template right now. It’s free

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