KWL ChartKWL Chart

KWL Chart Template

Focus on important ideas and expand your learning.

About the KWL Chart template

What is a KWL Chart?

A KWL Chart is a learning tool that helps guide people through an educational session or reading. All KWL Charts contain three columns: Know, Want to Know, and Learned. You begin your session by taking stock of what you know. Then, record what you want to get out of your session. Last, you record what you have learned.

How to create a KWL Chart

Step 1 - Draw three columns. Label the leftmost column Know. In the middle, label your column Want to Know. Label the right hand column Learned.

Step 2 - Begin by listing everything you know about a topic and recording that information in the Know column.

Step 3 - Then, generate a list of questions about what you Want to Know and record those questions in the Want to Know column.

Step 4 - After your session or reading, answer your questions in the Learned column.

KWL Chart Template

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