Fishbone Diagram Template | Online Ishikawa Diagram Maker | MiroFishbone Diagram Template | Online Ishikawa Diagram Maker | Miro

Fishbone Diagram Template

Visualize the potential causes of a problem, to solve it collaboratively.

About the Fishbone Diagram template

The Fishbone Diagram template (also called an Ishikawa Diagram template) can be used to explore the potential causes of a particular issue, enabling your team to find a solution more effectively. After brainstorming some ideas, you can sort them into groupings to hone in on the root cause of the problem. A Fishbone Diagram template is particularly useful when you must rely on experience and ideas rather than quantitative data.

Keep reading to learn more about the Fishbone Diagram template.

What is a Fishbone Diagram?

A Fishbone Diagram is also known as a “cause and effect diagram” or an Ishikawa Diagram (named after its inventor, Japanese quality control expert Kaoru Ishikawa). Teams can use a Fishbone Diagram to visualize all of the possible causes of a problem, zero in on the underlying cause, and anticipate the consequences with effective analysis.

4 benefits of a Fishbone Diagram

1. Focus on a cause, rather than symptoms

Using a Fishbone Diagram template helps teams truly get to the heart of why something is occurring, instead of simply describing the situation and mistaking secondary causes for the root cause. 

2. See all potential causes at a glance

A Fishbone Diagram displays multiple causes, ordered logically, in a visual manner. All stakeholders can explore and understand how they fit together holistically. 

3. Create a prompt for brainstorming

Many teams use a Fishbone Diagram as a jumping-off point for a structured brainstorming exercise, to generate a large number of potential ideas about what the root cause could be. 

4. Focus everyone around the root cause

Instead of identifying the causes of a problem independently, a Fishbone Diagram enables the team to focus on working together, analyzing, and prioritizing different possibilities until they land on the root cause. 

How to create a fishbone diagram in 3 steps

1. Define the problem statement

Create a statement that explains exactly what the problem is, and how and when it occurs. This should be added to the right side of your diagram, as the fish’s “head.” Make sure your team agrees on how the problem is being defined before you dive into exploring causes. 

2. Identify categories of causes

What broad categories or areas do potential causes fall into? For example, if you’re trying to diagnose a problem with your software product, you might want to look at users, software, or marketing. For a physical product, you might include people, methods, materials, machines, or the environment. Try to keep the number of categories below ten. 

3. List out the causes

Once you have your categories, it’s time to list out all of the individual causes for each bucket. These become the “bones” of the fish, which you can use as a basis for diagnosing the root cause of your problem. Some groups use the Fishbone template in conjunction with 5 Whys to systematically dig deeper and uncover new potential causes. 

FAQs about fishbone diagram template

How do you make a fishbone diagram?

Start by defining the problem statement and placing it on the right-hand side of the fishbone diagram. Then, identify potential causes of the problem, and categorize these causes. Finally, list out each cause as the “bones” of the fish.

How is a fishbone diagram used?

A fishbone diagram is a tool for root cause analysis that is used to brainstorm the root of a problem. It’s used for problem-solving and preemptively diagnosing issues before they are manifested to mitigate damage.

Where can I draw a fishbone diagram?

You can either use our fishbone diagram template or draw your fishbone diagram on Miro’s whiteboard, an infinite canvas. If you want inspiration for your fishbone diagram, you can also access more templates in Miroverse.

Fishbone Diagram Template

Get started with this template right now. It’s free

Related Templates
use-case-diagram-thumb-webuse-case-diagram-thumb-web
PreviewMore info

Use Case Diagram

A use case diagram is a visual tool that helps you analyze the relationships between personas and use cases. Use case diagrams typically depict the expected behavior of the system: what will happen and when. A use case diagram is helpful because it allows you to design a system from the perspective of the end user. It’s a valuable tool for communicating your desired system behavior in the language of the user, by specifying all externally visible system behavior.

Use Case Diagram
What So What Now What ThumbnailWhat So What Now What Thumbnail
PreviewMore info

What? So What? Now What?

The What? So What? Now What? Framework empowers you to uncover gaps in your understanding and learn from others’ perspectives. You can use the What? So What? Now What? Template to guide yourself or a group through a reflection exercise. Begin by thinking of a specific event or situation. During each phase, ask guiding questions to help participants reflect on their thoughts and experience. Working with your team, you can then utilize the template to record your ideas and to guide the experience.

What? So What? Now What?
website-flowchart-thumb-webwebsite-flowchart-thumb-web
PreviewMore info

Website Flowchart

A website flowchart, also known as a sitemap, maps out the structure and complexity of any current or future website. The flowchart can also help your team identify knowledge gaps for future content. When you’re building a website, you want to ensure that each piece of content gives users accurate research results based on keywords associated with your web content. Product, UX, and content teams can use flowcharts or sitemaps to understand everything contained in a website, and plan to add or restructure content to improve a website’s user experience.

Website Flowchart
SAFe ThumbnailSAFe Thumbnail
PreviewMore info

SAFe Program

Many organizations use the Agile model, but even companies that don’t rigorously adhere to all Agile standards have adopted Agile tools and methods like Program Increment (PI) Planning. Even if you’re not participating in a formal PI session, a program board can be a great way to establish communication across teams and stakeholders, align development objectives with business goals, clarify dependencies, and foster cross-functional collaboration. The board provides much-needed structure to planning sessions, yet is adaptable enough to accommodate brainstorming and alignment meetings.

SAFe Program
Random Word ThumbnailRandom Word Thumbnail
PreviewMore info

Random Words

Random word brainstorming is a simple, creative technique using random words to generate new ideas and creative solutions to your problems. Using random word prompts allows you to step beyond traditional boundaries and address challenges from a different direction. Random word brainstorming allows your team to unlock their creativity to solve business problems, create new inventions, improve existing ideas, or just think about problems in a new way.

Random Words
Mood Board ThumbnailMood Board Thumbnail
PreviewMore info

Mood Board

When you’re kicking off a creative project, it’s sometimes important to communicate the mood you’re trying to evoke — but it’s so hard to do it with words. So create a mood board and use images, color palettes, textures, and typography. Mood boards are also perfect for gathering inspiration and sketching out and pitching ideas, and they’re not just for designers — your content writers, sales teams, and product teams can use them too, and this template makes it easy for all of you to get started.

Mood Board