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Data Flow Diagram Maker Template

Represent the flow of data and model processes with a data flow diagram.

About the Data Flow Diagram (DFD) Maker template

What is a DFD (data flow diagram)?

Data flow diagrams (DFD) are visual representations that show the components that relate various parts of a data or information system together. They are used by organizations to visually depict the flow of data and system requirements in an entire system. DFD’s are useful in a number of business activities, especially in mapping the data necessary for a process to run; this includes:

  • Notation styles

  • Physical requirements

  • System automation

Who uses DFDs

DFDs are often used by growth teams, data analysts, and product teams that want to For anyone thinking about system design, a DFD is a good way to structure your thinking to see all the required components for a system to run. A DFD Maker template can be useful to help guide a structured analysis of all informational inputs in a system so this can be visually pieced together. 

Growth teams

Growth teams need to utilize data and understand data flows to find new growth opportunities. DFD diagrams help them better organize and understand how data is being tracked, what it’s influencing, and what pushes and pulls are in the system. 

Data analysts

No surprise here: data analysts are responsible for mining data and finding insights, so the structure and system requirements of data flows are critical for these analysts. 

Product teams

Product teams are tasked with understanding how customers interact with a product, and that includes how their data is inputted and where it goes. DFD’s are often used by product teams to trace where information flows from when it’s entered by the customer. 

DFD Diagram levels

Data flow diagrams are typically broken into different levels, with complexity increasing at each level. Here’s a brief overview of the different DFD levels:

Level 0

This is the simplest type of DFD diagram, and depicts a single process node and the various ways that it connects to external entities (the customer). This level doesn’t include much detail, but is much simpler to create and can still provide helpful insight on business processes.

Level 1

Level 1 DFDs provide more detail: like Level 0, they include one process node, but Level 1 DFDs breaks this node down into subprocesses, which incorporates more data flows. 

Level 2

This is the most detailed level of DFD, and involves breaking processes into even more detailed subprocesses, and depicting the relation of these processes to external entities via a context diagram.

Data Flow Diagram Maker Template

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