Project Kick-offProject Kick-off

Project Kickoff Template

Agree on shared goals and purpose before starting team projects.

About the Project Kick-Off Template

A project kick-off involves everyone who contributes to the execution of a project, and outlines the actions needed to move forward. By the end of the session, everyone should have a shared understanding of what success looks like. 

Some key things you’d want to cover in a kick-off meeting include:

  • Introductions of team and stakeholders

  • Project background and business need

  • Purpose and project objectives

  • Scope and timeline

  • Metrics to measure success

  • Defining project roles 

Keep reading to learn more about project kick-offs.

What is a project kick-off

A project kick-off helps set the vision and scope of team assignments. Different stakeholders often need to be involved, such as management, sponsors, project managers, and the project team. The kick-off helps establish communication between stakeholders, and finalize timelines. You can customize this template for internal team projects or external stakeholders like clients, consultants, or sponsors. 

Active participation in a project kick-off meeting can ensure that  expectations stay aligned. Kick-offs should help everyone get the information they need to contribute productively, help your team predict or bounce back from potential setbacks, and build confidence in forming  teams and external partnerships.

When to use project kick-offs

Kick-off meetings can take place after initiation of smaller projects, or when planning of larger projects is complete and execution is about to start. You can hold one meeting, or schedule them at the beginning of each phase of larger projects.

The kick-off process ensures that everyone understands the project’s purpose, and takes responsibility for their role. By setting expectations from the beginning, everyone can stay motivated and collaborate on doing  what’s needed to get to the project finish line.

Create your own project kick-offs

Starting your own project kick-offs is easy. Miro’s whiteboard tool is the perfect canvas to create and share them. Get started by selecting the Project Kick-Off Template, then take the following steps to make one of your own.

  1. Start with an icebreaker to set the tone of the meeting. Good relationships are the foundation of any successful project. 

    , games, activities, questions, or virtual events get everyone comfortable, engaged, and willing to navigate potentially challenging project phases together.

  2. Assign a note taker. Have a team member take responsibility for writing down developments, action steps, or changes that need to be implemented during the meeting. Note down questions for Q&A at the end of the meeting. 

     allows you to take more detailed notes if your text doesn’t fit on a sticky note or in a text box.

  3. Define the project background, scope, and approach. Your team will need specific context to help set them up for success. This is an opportunity to answer questions like: Why was the project started? What is our goal? What will we deliver and when? Who needs to be involved? How will we measure success?

  4. Assign team roles. Lay out everyone’s roles and responsibilities. This includes dependencies, hand-offs, and cross-functional relationships. Set some guidelines for how everyone will work together, especially for sharing processes, document versions, notes and feedback, and updates. 

  5. Set an agenda for kick-off and next steps. What does everyone need to do next? Review goals and action items. This can include making sure everyone has access to shared documents and resources. You can 

     directly on your Miro board.

  6. Leave time at the end for Q&A. Use this time to clear up any potential assumptions or guesswork. What haven’t you told everyone? What does your team need you to know? This is also a good time to schedule a follow-up meeting with your team, or follow up with anyone who couldn’t attend.

Project Kickoff Template

Get started with this template right now. It’s free

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