RACI MatrixRACI Matrix

RACI Matrix Template

Track responsibilities and ensure you have the right conversations with the right people.

About the RACI matrix template

What does RACI stand for?

RACI stands for Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, and Informed. Each of these words describes the person’s role and the last two are differentiated by what type of communication they should engage in during the project.

Who is responsible for the work? The Responsible person or people must finish a given project, process, or element of a project. 

Who is accountable for the outcome and the process? The Accountable person or people must be accountable for the completion of the task. As a recommended best practice, there should only be one Accountable person assigned to a given project. This person serves as all stakeholders’ point of contact throughout the project.

Who should you consult if there is a problem with the project? The Consulted person or people must provide information to stakeholders. If stakeholders have suggestions about changes that need to be made, or if they encounter issues, they report to the Consulted.

Who should you inform if you make a change to the project? The Informed person or people must be kept informed of progress. Their role is not necessary to provide feedback or suggest changes. However, you should keep them apprised of any changes, roadblocks, problems, or milestones.

Why use the RACI matrix?

The RACI matrix has a number of benefits. First, it allows your employees to more deeply engage with a project. Each employee on your team fits into a category of the RACI matrix. This reduces confusion about ownership and processes. Instead of clarifying expectations and responsibilities, your teammates can focus on their role.

Second, it helps you scale your team. Once you have assigned employees to each part of the RACI matrix, it becomes easier to train new hires and extend your processes. New hires can get up to speed more quickly, since their roles and responsibilities are clearly laid out in the matrix.

Third, the RACI matrix reduces opportunities for friction between employees and management. Since every employee has a well-defined role, they know the scope of their responsibilities -- and who to talk to if they have questions.

Fourth, using a RACI matrix can increase your efficiency. Filling out a RACI matrix makes it easier to set up meetings that have clear agendas and that aren’t redundant with other meetings. Invite stakeholders to your meetings without worrying about whether they should actually be there or whether their time would be better spent elsewhere.

RACI Matrix Template

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