Start Stop Continue RetrospectiveStart Stop Continue Retrospective

Start/ Stop/ Continue Retrospective Template

Get feedback on what your team wants to Start, Stop, and Continue doing.

About the Start Stop Continue Template

What is Start Stop Continue?

Giving and receiving feedback can be challenging and intimidating. It’s hard to look back over a quarter or even a week and parse a set of decisions into “positive” and “negative.” The Start Stop Continue framework was created to make it easier to reflect on your team’s recent experiences. It’s a simple but powerful tool that empowers individuals and teams to decide what to change going forward.

To use the Start Stop Continue framework, teams or individuals divide their activities and decisions into three categories: things they should start doing, things they should stop doing, and things that should continue to form a part of your processes.

Why use the Start Stop Continue template?

The Start Stop Continue Retrospective allows everyone to review the actions they've taken in the past, and determine which ones are worth stopping or continuing. Also, people can think about new actions they should begin doing. Each item results in behavioral change.

When should you use the Start Stop Continue template?

Many teams use the Start Stop Continue Retrospective template at the end of an agile sprint, but others find it is most useful at the end of an entire project, quarter, or event.

The 3 elements of Start Stop Continue

1. Start - What should you start doing? These are activities and behaviors that might improve your processes, reduce waste, and have a positive impact on the way your team functions. Think about technical and behavior elements that might fall into this category. What tools should you start using? Is there a communication style that might work better for your team?

2. Stop - What should you stop doing? These activities and behaviors might be inefficient, wasteful, or have a negative impact on the way your team functions. Again, it’s important to consider both technical and behavioral elements. Is your team using a tool that doesn’t work for you? Is there a meeting style or a communication method that isn’t working?

3. Continue - What should you keep doing? These are activities and behaviors that you’ve tried out and liked, but that aren’t yet part of your core processes. Take stock of the tools and methods you’ve experimented with since the last review cycle. What would you like to continue?

Start/ Stop/ Continue Retrospective Template

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