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Social Media Calendar Template

If you’re like most marketing teams, then social media plays a crucial role in your key initiatives. It’s important to stay organized and plan ahead so you can make the most of your social media presence.

About the Social Media Calendar Template

Keep reading to learn more about Social Media Calendars.

What is a Social Media Calendar

If you’re like most marketing teams, then social media plays a crucial role in your key initiatives. But with so many social media platforms to manage, social planning can easily become ad hoc rather than strategic. It’s important to stay organized and plan ahead so you can make the most of your social media presence.

A social media calendar can help you do just that. With a social media calendar, you can schedule out your posts for Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Facebook, plan what you want to say, and strategize for the future. Instead of scrambling to figure out what to post on social media every day, a social media calendar allows you to coordinate your posts to coincide with product launches, feature releases, or new content. Customize your posts so that they appeal to audiences on each platform, and establish metrics for success. Use this social media calendar to keep in touch with your customers and grow your platform.

Create your own Social Media Calendar

Making your own Social Media Calendar is easy. Miro’s whiteboard tool is the perfect canvas to create and share them. Get started by selecting the Social Media Calendar Template, then take the following steps to make one of your own.

  1. Do a content audit. Start by auditing your existing assets, including web content and social media content. First, to best utilize your social media accounts, gain a big-picture view of how you’re currently using content. That will allow you to develop a content strategy that maximizes your ROI.

  2. Figure out which social channels you’d like to use. Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook, and Instagram all have different audiences. For some businesses, it makes sense to have a presence on all four. Other companies might find an engaged audience on LinkedIn but not on the others. Yet other businesses should actually be on TikTok or Snapchat! Take some time to figure out which platforms are best for you. Who is your audience? Where are they going for content?

  3. Figure out how you want to use your social media calendar. Once you’ve decided where you’ll post your content, it’s time to develop goals for the calendar itself. Some teams prefer to use the calendar for everything: scheduling posts, saving social copy drafts, storing links to photos, videos, infographics, and GIFs, and tracking metrics. But other teams prefer to keep their calendars relatively lean so they can stay agile. Sit down with your team to decide what’s right for you. Remember, your goals are to streamline your workflows and boost efficiency, so there’s no point in doing anything that will create extra work. Instead, think about how you can use the calendar to best serve your needs.

  4. Decide on stakeholders. Get together with your team to decide who will be managing which social accounts. Using the calendar to stay organized, make sure everyone has access to the passwords, login info, images, and style guides they need to be successful.

  5. Start writing your posts! Now it’s time for the fun part. Start playing around with some social copy. If your team uses a voice, brand, or style guide, refer to the guide to ensure you are adhering to your company’s guidelines. Remember to include graphics like photos in your posts to keep your audience engaged and inspire them to read your content.

  6. Gather feedback from your team. Share your posts with your team to get their feedback. Are you creating punchy, memorable copy that will resonate with your audiences? Does your social copy map back to your goals? Is it driving your audience to engage with content on your site?

  7. Schedule your social posts. To maximize the ROI from your social plan, make sure you’re scheduling posts to correspond with key company initiatives: product launches, feature updates, content releases, and more. Depending on your goals, you might also schedule social posts for major holidays to stay in touch with your audience and build your online presence. Explore our premade legend of sticky notes in the template for guidance.

Social Media Calendar Template

Get started with this template right now. It’s free

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