Johari WindowJohari Window

Johari Window Template

Improve self-awareness and facilitate mutual understanding.

About the Johari Window Template

What is a Johari Window?

A Johari Window is a framework that allows individuals to enhance their understanding of themselves and others in a group, or among other groups. The model is rooted in two powerful ideas: that you’re more likely to trust people if you understand them better, and you’re more likely to trust yourself if you understand yourself better. Teams complete the Johari Window by filling out four quadrants, each of which reveals something they might not know about themselves or about others.

UCLA psychologists Joseph Luft and Harry Ingham first introduced the model in 1955. While researching group dynamics, Luft and Ingham found that groups that understood each other had an easier time communicating and working together. In today’s workplace, teams often use the Johari Window to deepen “soft” skills like empathy, cooperation, interpersonal development, and communication.

What does What does “Johari” mean? It's a combination of the names of the two men who created the Johari window, Joseph Luft and Harry Ingham. 

When to use a Johari Window

During team development, many teams use Johari Windows to deepen cross-functional or intra-team connections, help employees communicate better, and cultivate empathy. When organizations experience growth, for example, newer employees can sometimes clash with more established teams. Other teams can struggle to communicate cross-functionally, and translate across team cultures and norms. Still other teams might struggle when some employees work remotely. A Johari Window can help facilitate conversations within and among groups.

Create your own Johari Window

Creating your own Johari Windows is quick and easy. Miro’s Johari Window Template is the perfect canvas to create and share with your team. Get started by selecting the Johari Window Template, then take the following steps to make one of your own.

  1. First, fill out the top left-hand box, the “Open/Free” area. This quadrant contains information you know about yourself and also that other people know about you. For example, maybe you know you’re a good listener and other people have told you the same. It’s an easy point of entry for the exercise because you’re starting on common ground shared with your teammates.

  2. When filling out the Johari Window with your teammates, take a minute to write down a handful of personal traits and compare with feedback you receive from them. You can also discuss with your teammates using video or the chat function.

  3. Fill out the “Blind” area in the top right. Write down anything you don’t know about yourself but that other people know about you. This information can be positive or negative. Maybe you have a knack for diffusing tension that you’ve never noticed, or maybe you tend to get defensive when faced with unexpected feedback.

  4. How do you collect that information? By asking! Gather feedback from your teammates, managers, or cross-functional partners to see if you can reduce this area.

  5. Now fill out the bottom left or “Hidden” area. These are things you know about yourself but other people don’t know about you. For most of us, that includes anything we’d prefer to hide, like insecurities, fears, or undesirable traits. Perhaps you’re afraid that people won’t like you because you went to a lower-ranked college, or maybe you’re insecure about your job performance.

Although sharing the information in that quadrant can be scary, many people find it empowering. By talking about their insecurities and fears, people often realize that their coworkers share many of their “hidden” traits. Telling your teammates how you feel reduces the Hidden area and bolsters the Open area, fostering trust and cooperation. Finally, fill out the “Unknown” area. This one might be a bit tricky. In this box, write down your “unknown unknowns”: things nobody knows about you and you don’t know about yourself.

If that seems confusing or daunting, don’t worry. Think of this box as an opportunity to reflect on what you might discover about yourself. You might write something like: “There might be something that’s keeping me from realizing my true potential in the workplace, but I don’t yet know what it is.” By approaching this box as an opportunity rather than an obstacle, you can start to get excited about what the future might hold for you and your teammates!

Get started with the Johari Window Template>

Johari Window Template

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