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Executive Summary Template

Distill your ideas into an exciting and actionable plan.

About the Executive Summary template

What is an Executive Summary?

Business plans, investment proposals, project plans… Regardless of what you’re working on, you’ll need to draft an executive summary for your project. The summary should explain what you’re working on and what need you’re solving -- but make sure your reader doesn’t become bogged down in details. The goal of the executive summary is to sell your reader on your project: excite them, motivate them, and inspire them to keep reading.

How to use the Executive Summary template

Think of your executive summary as a movie trailer. You want to give you reader the highlights: the objectives, stakes, and how you plan to achieve your goals. The Executive Summary template empowers you to draft a summary that grabs your reader and motivates them to read the rest of the report.

Step 1: Start with a compelling first paragraph. Remember, this is your movie trailer. Movie trailers always drop you straight into the action. Your first paragraph should identify the problem that you’re seeking to solve. Show your reader that the stakes are high; lay out the consequences for failing to solve this problem. Then highlight the product, resources, or expertise that your company brings to bear on the problem.

Step 2: Once you’ve hooked your audience, it’s time to sell them on your product. What sets you apart? What makes your company unique? Do you have customers? Patents? An exciting new technology? Your executive summary is introducing a business plan or investments proposal, meaning you’re looking to get buy-in from your reader. If they are sold on your company, they will be more likely to give you the resources you need to succeed.

Step 3: Give the reader an idea of your budget and timeline. There is no need to go into exhaustive detail, since you will have the rest of the report to do that. But preview the nuts and bolts of your plan so your reader knows what to expect.

Why write an Executive Summary?

Executive summaries often preface business plans, project proposals, and other documentation. The audiences for these types of plans are often reviewing dozens of documents every week. If they thoroughly read every plan that crossed their desk, they would never accomplish anything! Writing a compelling executive summary helps ensure that the reader will actually study the rest of your plan. Executive summaries are designed to persuade your reader that your project or company is worth their time.

Why is an Executive Summary important?

Executive summaries are your first impression. However, because they can be so time-consuming, many people and organizations make the mistake of glossing over them. It is easy to see why: when you’re putting together a project, the last thing you want to do is pause to create documentation. The Executive Summary template is useful because it removes some of the strain. Rather than slogging through a dull, uninformative, or incomplete summary, the template allows you to put together a document that gives you an edge over your competition.

When to use the Executive Summary template

Use the executive summary template any time you need to write a project plan, investment proposal, or business plan.

Executive Summary Template

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