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Use Case Diagram Template

Illustrate examples of interactions between personas and use cases.

About the Use Case Diagram template

What is a use case diagram?

A use case diagram is a visual tool that helps you analyze the relationships between personas and use cases. This powerful visual framework helps your team quickly illustrate system functionality.

It typically depicts the expected behavior of the system: what will happen and when. A use case diagram is helpful because it allows you to design a system from the perspective of the end user. It’s a powerful tool for communicating your desired system behavior in the language of the user, by specifying all externally visible system behavior.

Generally, use case diagrams are not very detailed. They contain just the essential information that helps outline the following: represent the goals of system-user interactions, define and organize the functional requirements in a system, specify the context and requirements of a system, and model the basic flow of events in a use case. 

When to use a use case diagram 

Your use case diagram can model different scenarios where your system or application interacts with people, systems, or organizations. You can also use the diagram to represent and discuss goals that users (or “actors”) achieve with the help of your system or application.

Advantages of use case diagrams 

Use case diagrams are effective and malleable tools. They can help your team communicate and analyze the scope of your system; any scenario in which your system interacts with customers, organizations, or external systems; or goals or problems your applications help your customers solve. Draw a use case diagram anytime you need to specify context and requirements for a system to operate, or model the flow of events in a given use case.

Create your own use case diagram

Creating and sharing your team’s own use case diagram is easy, using Miro’s simple whiteboard tool. Start by selecting this Use Case Diagram Template, then follow these steps:

Step 1: Identify your actors. Actors are anybody interacting with your system. An actor can be a customer, user, person, system, or organization.

Step 2: Identify use cases. A good rule of thumb is to start by asking what actors need from the system. For example, at a library, actors need to pick up books, return books, get a library card, reserve rooms, and use the internet. These are all use cases.

Step 3: Identify common functionalities that you can reuse across the system. If two or more of your use cases share a common functionality, then you can take that functionality and add it to a separate use case.

Step 4: Identify generalizations. Are there any actors associated with similar use cases who trigger cases unique to them? Then you can generalize that particular actor. A commonly cited example is the “make a payment” use case in a payment system, which can be generalized to “pay by debit card,” “pay by cash,” “pay by credit card,” and so on.

Use Case Diagram Template

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