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One-on-one Meeting Template

Organize your one-on-one meetings to be more productive.

About the One-On-One meeting template

One-on-one meetings are common for managers and their direct reports, but it’s not always easy to ensure they’re productive. Use our template to create structure, take a quick pulse check, and outline action items for the coming week.

How do you structure a one-on-one meeting?

One-on-one meetings can be one of the most productive parts of your day or a roadblock. It all hinges on how well you structure the meeting and prepare for it beforehand. The one-on-one meeting template empowers you to hold better meetings, accomplish your goals, and push your teammates to their full potential.

Here are a few steps to run your one-on-one meeting effectively:

1. Create an agenda 

To run an effective one-on-one meeting, use the template to create an agenda. You don’t have to stick to the plan, but it can help to lay out a series of goals, discussion topics, questions, or action items. There’s no need to write in complete sentences; bullet points work well too! The template allows you to keep track of the conversation and ensure you stay on task.

2. Do a mood check-in 

Before diving into your one-on-one meeting topics, do a quick mood check. This exercise is perfect because you can align expectations and develop empathy towards the other person, and better understand their needs at that moment. 

3. Talk about the present moment 

In general, you can start talking about the present moment, but you can also pick a set period of time and analyze it. Discuss what's going well (or did go well) and what you are focusing on at the moment. After talking about the good things, you can move on and discuss any frustrations or setbacks. 

4. Define next steps 

Once you’ve done the quick retrospective, you can move into the next steps and discuss strategies to improve your work in the future. Think of this moment as an opportunity to try new ideas and initiate new projects. 

5. What else? Add more topics to your one-on-one! 

After you discussed the most pressing things, this is the moment to bring to the table anything you'd like to share or ask and didn't have the opportunity. It can be anything, from new learnings to new business trends—this space lets the discussion flow more freely and creatively. 

Why have one-on-one meetings?

One-on-one meetings are a vital part of the relationship between managers and employees. It’s important for managers to develop a regular cadence of checking in, touching base, delivering feedback, and receiving feedback.

In the short term, one-on-one meetings help managers and their employees function better as a team. Managers can provide feedback on their employee’s projects, while employees can discuss things they would like to do better. One-on-ones are also an important tool for discovering interpersonal issues and problems with processes before they develop into something more serious. Most managers use one-on-ones to check on project progress and discuss the employee’s performance.

In the long term, one-on-one allow managers to help their employees succeed. Many managers use these meetings as opportunities to ask employees about their career path. Depending on the path their employees would like to follow, managers can provide tips and assign projects that suit their interests.

FAQ about the One-on-One Meeting template

What are good questions to ask during one-on-one meetings?

Here are some possible discussion topics for your template: What have you accomplished over the last week? Which tasks have you enjoyed? Which do you prefer? Is there any I could help make your project more enjoyable? Do you have any suggestions that could help us work better as a team? What bottlenecks have you encountered in your current projects? Do you feel like you’re learning and growing at work? What can I do to better support your growth? 

One-on-one Meeting Template

Get started with this template right now. It’s free

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