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One-on-one Meeting Template

Organize your one-on-one meetings to be more productive.

About the One-On-One meeting template

How do you structure a one-on-one meeting?

One-on-one meetings can be one of the most productive parts of your day--or a roadblock. It all hinges on how well you structure the meeting and prepare for it beforehand. The one-on-one meeting template empowers you to hold better meetings, accomplish your goals, and push your teammates to their full potential.

To run an effective one-on-one meeting, use the template to create an agenda. You don’t have to stick to the plan, but it can help to lay out a series of goals, discussion topics, questions, or action items. There’s no need to write in complete sentences; bullet points work well too! The template allows you to keep track of the conversation and ensure you stay on task.

In general, you can start by looking back at the previous week. Identify what went well and what could have gone better. Once you’ve done a quick retrospective, you can move into general discussion topics.

Here are some possible discussion topics for your template: What have you accomplished over the last week? Which tasks have you enjoyed? Which do you prefer? Is there any I could help make your project more enjoyable? Do you have any suggestions that could help us work better as a team? What bottlenecks have you encountered in your current projects? Do you feel like you’re learning and growing at work? What can I do to better support your growth? 

Why have one-on-one meetings?

One-on-one meetings are a vital part of the relationship between managers and employees. It’s important for managers to develop a regular cadence of checking in, touching base, delivering feedback, and receiving feedback.

In the short term, one-on-one meetings help managers and their employees function better as a team. Managers can provide feedback on their employee’s projects, while employees can discuss things they would like to do better. One-on-ones are also an important tool for discovering interpersonal issues and problems with processes before they develop into something more serious. Most managers use one-on-ones to check on project progress and discuss the employee’s performance.

In the long term, one-one-one allow managers to help their employees succeed. Many managers use these meetings as opportunities to ask employees about their career path. Depending on the path their employees would like to follow, managers can provide tips and assign projects that suit their interests.

One-on-one Meeting Template

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