Jobs to be DoneJobs to be Done

Jobs to be Done Template

Help your team discover unmet customer needs

About the Jobs To Be Done Template

What is Jobs To Be Done

Jobs To Be Done (JTBD) is a framework used by entrepreneurs, start-ups, and business managers to define who their customer is. 

The framework believes that every customer hires a product or service to do a job. And if that job is unfulfilled, the customer will then fire the product or service to search for a better alternative. 

The framework is useful for teams who want to learn about potential business risks through a customer-focused lens. JTBD frames the customer’s decision-making processes as a way to define a market based on an underserved “job.” 

A standard Job Story is structured:

When I … I Want To … So That I ...

This reveals a situation, a motivation, and an expected outcome for your customer. 

Alongside this statement, it’s also useful to document the tools being hired by the customer, the reasons for making the hire, and the barriers to hiring.

When to use Jobs To Be Done Template

Jobs To Be Done helps teams better understand their customers and improve any human interaction aspect related to your product or service. Beyond product development, JTBD can be used to improve business operations and how well you know your customer.

Ideally, you would have run a series of JTBD customer interviews before using this template. The interviews will give you a sample of qualitative data about the circumstances under which customers bought a product or service and their motivation.

JTBD plays well with other frameworks that your team may already use like personas or customer journey maps. Trying a “blended” approach to learning about your customer can help you make long-term strategic decisions and prioritize shipping features. 

JTBD can be a useful puzzle piece for understanding:

  • What action-based triggers lead customers to buy your product or service

  • How customers make purchase decisions (or don’t follow through)

  • Customer doubts during the decision-making journey

JTBD can also be useful for understanding why customers leave you. The insights you uncover can help you sell and develop your product or service for the jobs your customers need to hire for the most.

Create your own Jobs To Be Done framework

Making your own Jobs To Be Done framework is easy. Miro’s whiteboard tool is the perfect canvas to create and share them. Get started by selecting the Jobs To Be Done template, then take the following steps to make one of your own.

Define the core “job to be done” function. This statement needs to identify the market, as well as how it relates to a core functional job that the customer needs to be done. An example would be “get dinner” (verb + object) “while driving home from work” (context and circumstances). 

With the facilitator’s help, agree as a team on the reasons and tools your customers rely on. As a team, you want to share a vision about which customers to target for growth, what the job to be done is, all the steps involved in the job, related and emotional jobs, and the customer’s unmet needs concerning the job. 

Decide on your desired outcomes and metrics as a team. What does a successful execution of the core functional job look like? An outcome can be defined as “the direction of improvement + metric + object of control + customer’s circumstances.” Take the opportunity to discuss with your team if these defined outcomes are likely to be under or overserved, appropriately served, irrelevant, or considered table stakes. 

Turn your customer insights into actions. After you’ve filled in why your customers are hiring, firing, and facing barriers, you can start making customer-informed decisions. This can include better positioning your products and services, uncovering opportunities to innovate at job-level, and coming up with ideas for complementary products or services to get the job done.

Jobs to be Done Template

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