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Entity Relationship Diagram Template

Design and graphically represent your database.

About the Entity Relationship Diagram template

What is an entity relationship diagram?

An entity relationship diagram (ERD), is a structural diagram that allows your team to portray relationships between actors in a system. This type of diagram is used in databases or information systems design. ERDs are typically used to visualize relationships between different roles (like a product manager’s relationship with a developer), tangible business objects (like a product or service), and intangible business objects (like a backlog). Read on to find out how these powerful tools can help your team.

Advantages of using entity relationship diagrams

ERDs allow your team to visualize how complex, interconnected entities connect and overlap in a system. This powerful tool is simple to understand and use, making it beneficial for both new and seasoned teammates to collaborate.

When do you use an ERD? Here are some examples: 

  1. To educate your teammates: ERDs are powerful tools for educating your teammates on the relationship between systems or entities. 

  2. To onboard new teammates: Because ERDs are visual, they’re an easy way to showcase information for new hires.

  3. Whenever you need to create documentation before making a change: When preparing to change a process, it can be useful to document your existing process. By doing so, you ensure that all necessary measures are in place in case you need to return to the previous process or iterate on the current one.

Create your own entity relationship diagram

Making your own entity relationship diagram is easy, using Miro’s template. Simply select this Entity Relationship Diagram template and follow these steps:

Step 1: Identify all entities in the system. An entity should appear only once in a diagram. Create rectangles for all entities and name them properly.

Step 2: Add meaningful names to the entities so they’re easy to understand. 

Step 3: Identify relationships between entities. Connect the relationships with lines or arrows.

You can customize the diagram according to your needs. For example, you can add shapes, change colors, make sticky notes, and draw arrows. Next, add documents and/or images to clarify and enhance your template. Invite your teammates to join and collaborate with you on your ERD. Any changes will be saved automatically.

Entity Relationship Diagram Template

Get started with this template right now. It’s free

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