Customer Problem StatementCustomer Problem Statement

Customer Problem Statement Template

Focus your team’s attention on a customer’s experience.

About the Customer Problem Statement template

What is a Customer Problem Statement?

A Customer Problem Statement clearly elaborates on the problem that your product or service solves for your customers. The statement is meant to help you understand the experience you are attempting to transform, or the space you are attempting to enter, by building your new product or service. A well-articulated Customer Problem statement is important because it helps you and your team wrap your heads around the problem you’re solving and empathize with potential customers. If you don’t have a good idea of the problem before you start building, you might find yourself solving the problem incorrectly, or solving a different one entirely.

How do you create a Customer Problem Statement?

To create a Customer Problem Statement, be sure to describe the customer’s current conditions and situation. Consider how they feel, how they’re being impacted financially or in other ways, and any other important details about their thoughts or feelings.

Why use the Customer Problem Statement approach?

When you use the Customer Problem Statement, you’re thinking about your customer’s thoughts and feelings, which increases your likelihood of creating something they will find valuable. Additionally, problem statements help teams align their efforts around a common goal, clearly define what that goal is, and feel invested in achieving it.

Tips for creating a Customer Problem Statement

  • Don’t mention your product or service in the statement itself. You’re focusing on the problem, not the solution.

  • Articulate the status quo. Remember, that’s what you’re trying to disrupt.

  • Think about limitations your potential customers may have.

  • Target a specific group with whom you can build empathy.

  • Provide measurable outcomes. This makes it easier to come up with metrics you can use to track your progress.

Example of a poorly-written Customer Problem Statement

“Customers need this product because it would allow them to access their textbooks on their phone.”

This statement is poorly-written because it mentions your product and does not elaborate on a challenge that your customers are facing. While it tells you why your product is convenient, it does not situate your product as a disruption to the status quo.

Example of a well-written Customer Problem Statement

“Customers find it cumbersome to carry their textbooks around and risk forgetting their textbooks when they need to bring them to class.”

By contrast, this statement is well-written. It does not mention your product or service. Instead, it hones in on a challenge that your customers are facing and elaborates the problem. 

Customer Problem Statement Template

Get started with this template right now. It’s free

Related Templates
crazy-eights-thumb-webcrazy-eights-thumb-web
PreviewMore info

Crazy Eights

Sometimes you just need to get the team’s creative juices flowing for a brainstorm—and get them thinking of as many ideas as they can, as fast as they can. Crazy Eights will do it in a hurry. Favoring quantity over quality, this sketch brainstorming exercise challenges them to come up with eight ideas in eight minutes, which leaves no time to second guess ideas. It’s perfect for early stages of development, and it’s a team favorite for being fast paced and fun.

Crazy Eights
Agenda-web-thumbAgenda-web-thumb
PreviewMore info

Agenda

Even when you’ve hosted meetings for years, hosting them online is something altogether different. Keeping them structured, purposeful, and on-task is key. That all starts with having a detailed agenda, and this template makes it so easy for you to create one. The best part? Agendas are often dry and boring—but not here. We make it easy for you to sprinkle in your choice of graphics, colors, fonts, and images to give your agenda personality and creative style.

Agenda
Project Status ThumbnailProject Status Thumbnail
PreviewMore info

Project Status Report

A project status report is a short, timely document that keeps your project stakeholders informed and aligned on what is happening, and why. You can start writing this document on your own, then include your teammates as well to produce a timely and relevant report. A project status report should ideally compare the current state of your project against its projected plan. The report tracks on a high level how you achieve your goals, even if you experience setbacks. It’s also likely to be read by an executive-level audience controlling budgets and governance, which can help you keep the report focused on critical issues.

Project Status Report
ansoff-matrix-thumb-webansoff-matrix-thumb-web
PreviewMore info

Ansoff Matrix

Keep growing. Keep scaling. Keep finding those new opportunities in new markets—and creative new ways to reach customers there. Sound like your approach? Then this template might be a great fit. An Ansoff Matrix (aka, a product or market expansion grid) is broken into four potential growth strategies: Market Penetration, Market Development, Product Development, and Diversification. When you go through each section with your team, you’ll get a clear view of your options going forward and the potential risks and rewards of each.

Ansoff Matrix
2×2 Prioritization Matrix-thumb2×2 Prioritization Matrix-thumb
PreviewMore info

2x2 Prioritization Matrix

Ready to set boundaries, prioritize your to-dos, and determine just what features, fixes, and upgrades to tackle next? The 2x2 prioritization matrix is a great place to start. Based on the lean prioritization approach, this template empowers teams with a quick, efficient way to know what's realistic to accomplish and what’s crucial to separate for success (versus what’s simply nice to have). And guess what—making your own 2x2 prioritization matrix is easy.

2x2 Prioritization Matrix
stickies-packs-thumb-web (1)stickies-packs-thumb-web (1)
PreviewMore info

Stickies Packs

Sticky notes are a popular feature of any virtual, hybrid, or in-person brainstorming session. Participants can use sticky notes to submit, sort, or vote for ideas -- and much more. Use the Stickies Packs template to customize groups of sticky notes for your participants. You can then break your participants into groups according to the color of their sticky notes, or categorize ideas based on color, and so on. The Stickies Packs template empowers you to create brainstorming sessions that fit your needs and align with your goals.

Stickies Packs