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Reverse Brainstorming Template

Reverse your thinking in order to find the solution to a problem.

About the Reverse Brainstorming Template

What is reverse brainstorming?

Reverse brainstorming is a 

 that prompts a group to think of problems, rather than solutions. Because humans naturally think of problems, it’s a great way to get a group to anticipate problems that may occur during a project.

How it works

Here's 

 using the reverse brainstorming method:

  • Start by identifying the problem. Write down a description of it so it’s clear for each participant.

  • Next, reverse the problem. Instead of thinking of solutions to the problem, think of causes or things that could happen to make the problem worse.

  • Now, collect ideas from your participants. Ask your team to generate ideas around ways in which the problem could get worse. There are no bad ideas—accept every possible scenario your team can think of, and don’t offer criticism.

  • Reverse ideas again. By now, you have several ideas. Discuss them, and reverse them again, into solutions to those problems.

  • Lastly, evaluate the ideas. 

  • Now is the time to evaluate which ideas are feasible. As a group, decide what the best solution will be to your original problem. When to use reverse brainstorming

Reverse brainstorming is a great method to use in several scenarios. For example, when people have trouble coming up with ideas quickly, or if participants come into the 

 with strong opinions that might hinder the free flow of new ideas. It can also be useful if your team is highly analytical.

By reversing the problem to focus on the cause, or looking at ways the problem could get worse, it helps identify solutions more easily. After all, humans identify problems so much more easily than they can think of solutions. This reverse thinking can help lead you to groundbreaking solutions.

Try the Reverse Brainstorming Template

Miro's virtual canvas is a great 

. Here’s how you can start reverse brainstorming using this template:

Step 1: Open the template to start customizing it for your reverse brainstorming session. Start by identifying the problem.

Step 2: Invite your group to join the reverse brainstorm. Be sure to explain the process before you get started.

Step 3: Use the template to move through the reverse brainstorming process with your team.

Reverse Brainstorming Template

Get started with this template right now.

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