Meeting ReflectionsMeeting Reflections

Meeting Reflection Template

Share learning experiences and new ways of thinking to grow as a team

About the Meeting Reflections Template

Meeting Reflections give your team an opportunity to talk about how they approach their work. 

The reflective mode of this meeting creates space for a conversation to clarify how people think, feel, articulate the ‘why’ behind their work beyond basic project management needs. 

Keep reading to learn more about meeting reflections.

What is a Meeting Reflection

A meeting reflection is led by “learners” or team members who share stories with the rest of their team. 

Learners can choose to present a topic or story, and the rest of the team can follow up with a series of questions. Alternatively, the session can be set-up as a live question-and-answer session between the nominated learner and the team. 

Typically, one person on your team will assume the “learner” role who shares a recent experience that may benefit everyone else. The rest of the team will take on an active listener role, asking questions as needed, making a meaningful connection to their own work, or wider business values and initiatives. 

When to use a Meeting Reflection

A Meeting Reflection aims to dig deep into how your team learns new skills, document key observations, and figure out how to build on those skills for future development. 

Meeting reflections allow teammates to share new information about a client’s business or an internal business initiative. Your team can also offer problem-solving techniques or even recommend a new book, podcast, or movie worth seeking out. 

These group reflections can also encourage colleagues at all levels to engage in each other’s professional development. 

Create your own Meeting Reflection 

Making your own Meeting Reflection is easy. Miro’s whiteboard tool is the perfect canvas to create and share them. Get started by selecting the Meeting Reflection Template, then take the following steps to make one of your own.

  1. Start with an icebreaker to set the tone.

  2. To get everyone thinking creatively from the start, encourage an unstructured communication approach. From 

  3. , give everyone an opportunity to get to know each other.

  4. Ask the “learner” to share what they’ve learned recently.

  5. As the learner in your group is sharing their experience, encourage the team to write down their observations on sticky notes. These notes can be assigned to a grid (such as “what have you missed?”) that aligns with the narrative and can prompt useful follow-up questions. 

  6. Respond with questions, observations, or advice as a team.

  7. After the learner has finished speaking, ask each person in the group to share one observation or question to dig deeper into the story. The more specific the ask or detail being shared, the better the insight. Nominate a note-taker in the group to write down the insights, and use 

  8.  to make sure these discussions stay timely and on track. 

  9. Decide on follow-up actions as a team. 

  10. To wrap up, the note-taker in the group can go through a verbal summary of your meeting. The learner can also add any details that may have been left out. As a team, you can decide if you’d like to follow-up on any ideas uncovered during the session. You may also want to repeat the meeting on a different date for someone else’s benefit on the team. See if there’s potential to turn this into a regular team ritual if it proves to be useful for team-building and skill sharing.

Meeting Reflection Template

Get started with this template right now. It’s free

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