Cross-Functional FlowchartCross-Functional Flowchart

Cross Functional Flowchart Template

Uncover project bottlenecks and clarify team responsibilities.

About the Cross-Functional Flowchart Template

Cross-functional flowcharts (also known as “deployment” or “swim lane” flowcharts) can help you visualize business relationships and end-to-end project contributions. These elements that depend on each other can include the relationship between functions and stakeholders (such as departments and clients) or project phases and milestones. 

The map format allows you to make your business processes or project phases more transparent with added layers of detail and structure. 

Keep reading to learn more about cross-functional flowcharts.

What is a cross-functional flowchart

A cross-functional flowchart shows how people from different teams contribute to, and complete, a business process or project. 

The lanes in the chart can help separate and clarify which department, employee, or person outside of the business contributes to a business or project. 

Each person (such as a customer, client, or representative from a specific function) who contributes to the big-picture process is assigned a lane. That assigned area outlines all the activities they are responsible for moving forward to the finis hline. 

When to use cross-functional flowchart

Cross-functional flowcharts can be used to improve your team and organizational processes. These changes can include the need to work out what factors create inefficiencies and address delays that impact both internal and external stakeholders. 

A cross-functional flowchart can also help different teams or departments better understand each other’s responsibilities and capabilities. These details are especially useful when people haven’t worked together before or struggle to understand what different teams do on a day-to-day basis.

Create your own cross-functional flowchart

Making your own cross-functional flowchart is easy. Miro’s whiteboard tool is the perfect canvas to create and share them. Get started by selecting the Cross-Functional Flowchart Template, then take the following steps to make one of your own.

  1. Decide what your lanes are.

    Decide what divisions (functions) or identities (internal or external stakeholders) need representation on the flow chart. 

  2. Define what the start of your process is.

    .What’s the first action that triggers a series of tasks or interactions? Maybe it’s a client confirmation or a customer request. Each division will have a different starting point, but you’ll see that there may be points in the journey or interaction where functions or individuals coincidentally meet (or need to coordinate and communicate, for a smoother process to roll out).

  3. Keep adding steps to your process until you get to the last step or endpoint.

    What does the flow of information look like from start to finish? What decisions need to be made? Ask yourself and your team these questions as you map out each situation. Try 

     to convert your quick sketches to sticky notes, shapes, and connecting lines that work together to create a logical flow chart. 

  4. Update your flow chart as needed—and use alongside other process-based templates.

    Cross-functional flowcharts were designed to work alongside – or be connected to – other templates, such as. Rally your teammates, stakeholders and leadership team around a people-first vision by helping them see the bigger picture alongside the all-important details.

Cross Functional Flowchart Template

Get started with this template right now. It’s free

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